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Toxic Research

Political Ecologies and the Matter of Damage

Noah Theriault and Simi Kang

” is collaborative research that challenges oppression by advancing a community's aspirations, capacities, and resources. This “desire-centered” approach aims not to ignore harm, but instead “to reformulate the ways research is framed and conducted” so

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Introduction

Elusive Matsutake

Lieba Faier

In this special issue, we draw on our collaborative research as the Matsutake Worlds Research Group to explore the world-making dynamics of multispecies encounters. We center our exploration on matsutake, a gourmet mushroom eaten primarily in Japan. Drawing on cases from around the world, we suggest that the cosmopolitan worlds of matsutake cannot be accounted for by any single agent or individual set of cultural or political economic processes. Rather, we propose that contingent multispecies attunements and coordinations knit together the various world-making processes that allow matsutake to flourish. We use the notion of ‘elusiveness’ to capture these shifting dynamics of attraction, coordination, and elusion.

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Traversing Fields

Affective Continuities across Muslim and Christian Settings in Berlin

Omar Kasmani and Dominik Mattes

–2019). It is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) under the framework of the Collaborative Research Center “Affective Societies” at Freie Universität Berlin. Omar Kasmani and Dominik Mattes work closely in collaboration with Hansjörg Dilger, the

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Introduction

Elsewhere Affects and the Politics of Engagement across Religious Life-Worlds

Omar Kasmani, Nasima Selim, Hansjörg Dilger, and Dominik Mattes

Collaborative Research Center “Affective Societies.” Annalisa Butticci and Amira Mittermaier were joint keynote speakers at the workshop. Notes 1 “Mother's Day” is an art installation by the British-Israeli artist Smadar Dreyfus, which was exhibited as

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Geoffrey Aung

multisited, collaborative research project on ports and global capitalism in Singapore, Pusan (South Korea), Rotterdam (Holland), and Piraeus (Greece). Lin Weiqiang, of the National University of Singapore's Department of Geography, is leading a multisited

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Politicizing Elsewhere(s)

Negotiating Representations of Neo-Pentecostal Aesthetic Practice in Berlin

Dominik Mattes

fieldwork formed part of a research project within the Collaborative Research Center (CRC) “Affective Societies” at Freie Universität Berlin. 1 The project comparatively explored whether and how affective forms of religious practice engender feelings of

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Critical Thin

Haunting Sufis and the Also-Here of Migration in Berlin

Omar Kasmani

(2015–2019). The project was carried out within the framework of the Collaborative Research Center “Affective Societies” at Freie Universität Berlin and was funded by the German Research Foundation. I am particularly grateful to Jan Slaby for first

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Laurent Berger

below); and second, by establishing mycorrhizal relations between the fungi and host trees as an analogical model of symbiotic functioning for this collaborative research. As a result, the academic outsourcing of empirical data through the use of para

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Introduction

Mobility in doctoral education – and beyond

Corina Balaban and Susan Wright

This special issue emerged as a result of Universities in the Knowledge Economy (UNIKE), a four-year collaborative research project and training programme for early-stage researchers that investigated the dynamic relationships between universities and knowledge economies in Europe and in the Asia-Pacific Rim. The project was funded by the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission (EC) and included researchers based at six different universities in five European countries. Mobility was not only a widespread research interest within the UNIKE academic community but also a reality of the project, which was in itself a practical example of mobility in doctoral education, as envisaged by the European Commission. Many questions emerged as to how mobility became so central to the European Union’s policies for higher education, but also as to how the portrayal of mobility on a policy level compared to the actual lived experiences of mobile students and researchers. ‘Mobility’ can refer to many different things: geographical mobility, social mobility, cross-sectoral mobility or intellectual mobility (interdisciplinarity). The academic literature mostly treats them separately, with clusters of studies around each concept. In contrast, this special issue sets out to investigate these different types of mobility collectively, with authors covering several parts or the whole spectrum of mobilities. We believe it is valuable to discuss these four different aspects of mobility together for two reasons. First, they are often mentioned together in higher education policy as ‘desirable’ characteristics of a given education programme. Second, the ideal profile of the new, flexible knowledge worker supposedly combines all these aspects of mobility in one persona. The policy literature produced by influential stakeholders in higher education such as the European Commission and the OECD focuses on how to encourage, foster and support different kinds of mobility, working on the assumption that mobility is inherently good and will benefit countries, higher education systems and individuals. Much of the academic literature has adopted a similar approach, focusing on ways to enable mobility rather than challenge it.

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‘My Waka Journey’

Introducing a New Co-Editor

Patrick Laviolette

Cultures and the Journal of Ethnology and Folkloristics. My formal ethnographic fieldwork has included both individual and collaborative research. While employed by the Bartlett School of Graduate Studies at UCL, I collected new empirical material on