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Ananya Chakravarti

The call to attend to a history of affect is hardly a new one in the profession: in 1941, in a classic essay entitled “La sensibilité et l’histoire: Comment reconstituer le vie affective d’autrefois?,” Lucien Febvre laid out an agenda for just such a historiographical turn. His reasoning, however, had less to do with the need for a history of affect per se than with the belief that the history of ideas or of institutions, both of them mainstays of traditional historiography, “are subjects that the historian can neither understand nor make understood without this primordial interest that I call the psychological.” In a perceptive review essay of the historiography of emotions that marked the beginning of the current affective turn in historical inquiry, Barbara Rosenwein argued that Febvre’s turn toward such a history was less a repudiation of the political focus of history than a belief born from observing the rise of Nazism: “politics itself is not rational, not unemotional.” As Rosenwein notes, Febvre answered the skeptics in his own essay: “The history of hate, the history of fear, the history of cruelty, the history of love; stop bothering us with this idle chatter. But that idle chatter … will tomorrow have turned the universe into a fetid pile of corpses.”

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Introduction

Concepts of Emotions in Indian Languages

Margrit Pernau

Emotions are, of course, no newcomers to the writing of South Asian history. Works on gender history have included discussions on love; research on riots and revolts has examined fear, anger, and hope; the historiography on nationalism would not be possible

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Democratic Procedures Are Not Inherently Democratic

A Critical Analysis of John Keane's The New Despotism (Harvard University Press, 2020)

Gergana Dimova

, dissenting. They may take it to the next level and seek to overthrow the regime. This feasible perspective of democratic procedures benefiting the demos, and not the elites, is what despotisms fear the most. Their fears are justified. Mikhail Gorbachev

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Nicholas L. Syrett

forms of queer relations in the past. Fears about the effects of such writings on perceptions of queer people today may also be compounded by worries about the consequences for particular queer researchers if they come to be associated with age

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Resist and Revivify

Democratic Theory in a Time of Defiance

Jean-Paul Gagnon and Emily Beausoleil

the creation of a society in which “common” individuals do not live a life that actively cultivates civil liberty. This life, as we understand it, is one that tries to lessen the fear and hatred that sometimes germinates among, and between, people

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Struggles over Expertise

Practices of Politicization and Depoliticization in Participatory Democracy

Taina Meriluoto

idea with a colleague from our local branch, they acclaimed in slight horror: “But [if we were to listen to everyone] then there's no telling what kind of ideas they might have!” The quote summarizes several fears that my colleagues held: they had

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Pluralist Democracy and Non-Ideal Democratic Legitimacy

Against Functional and Global Solutions to the Boundary Problem in Democratic Theory

Tom Theuns

, which, given the centrality of accountability to democracy, undermines the possibility of democratic government. One classic, liberal, response to a global state stems from the fear that centralizing all political power in one institution would lead to

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“Amazing Rapidity”

Time, Public Credit, and David Hume's Political Discourses

Edward Jones Corredera

nature of this debate by suggesting that Hume feared the velocity of credit would neutralize states, undermine the political appeal of foresight, and shape the fate of future generations. 18 These fears, and the specters of their failed solutions, have

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Policing the French Empire

Colonial Law Enforcement and the Search for Racial-Territorial Hegemony

Samuel Kalman

's comprehensive research reveals the juxtaposition of genuine environmental fears concerning sustainability (echoing identical concerns from the metropole in the 1860s) with the reality of a French monopoly over forestry that resulted in starvation and land

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Bad Custom

The Meanings and Uses of a Legal Concept in Premodern Europe

Anthony Perron

express the anxieties of those in power at times of change? In what ways was the assault on “wicked practice” tied to a notion of legal time and a fear of corruption, decline, and desuetude? How can interpretive lenses from outside history (theology and