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Introduction

Why Q1 Hamlet Matters

Terri Bourus

, a paperback anthology of revenge plays, textbooks designed for college students. Early in 2015, Zachary Lesser wrote a groundbreaking, award-winning history of the effect – on criticism, scholarship and performance – of the rediscovery of Q1. 1

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Christian Pilgrimage Groups in Jerusalem

Framing the Experience Through Linear Meta-Narrative

Vida Bajc

Christian pilgrims come to the Holy Land to visit specific physical places that give their faith a tangible form. On organized tours, pilgrimage is structured through an itinerary which consists of a series of encounters, purposefully shaped to bring to life the story of Jesus. These encounters involve performative practices of tour-group leaders at specific symbolic sites with particular narratives. The biblical reality is invoked through a process of meta-framing which allows for a cognitive shift from the mundane walking from site to site into a biblical reality. Meta-framing interlaces the Christian religious memory, performed by the spiritual leader, with the Israeli historical memory, performed by the Israeli tour guide, into a single, linear meta-narrative.

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Introduction

Robert Shaughnessy

Stratford-upon-Avon in March 2018. The first event of its kind in the United Kingdom, the symposium drew together scholars, service professionals, practitioners and participants in Shakespeare and applied theatre (an umbrella term for a range of performance

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The Adventures of Miss Brown, Miss Jones and Miss Robinson

tourist writing and tourist performance from 1860 to 1914

Jill Steward

Judith Adler has described travel as an art of performance (Adler 1989a: 1368), a way of ‘world-making’, in which the corporeal and discursive strategies adopted by the traveller moving through space from one place to another utilise the equivalent of classic aesthetic devices in the construction of the narrative through which the journey is registered and the realities it evokes for the audience whose presence is implied by the metaphor (1382–3). The audience too plays a role in the creative process in that its particular expectations constitute ‘one source of explicitly articulated standards of performance’ (1378).

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Touring the African Diaspora

Cheryl Finley

This article examines the impact of art, performance, and technology on the global transformation of heritage tourism in recent years. Thanks to a series of case studies focusing on sites of memory deemed important to diasporic Africans, this article shows how art, performance, and technology are central to identity formation through an examination of mnemonic aesthetics and practices. Recent changes in heritage tourism have given rise to the establishment of categories such as “tangible“ and “intangible“ heritage as well as the construction of museums, the implementation of walking tours or the promotion of reenactments and ritual performances alongside environmental, volunteer, and virtual tourism. But how do tourists' interpretations of historic sites of memory change when various economic, political, social, and cultural factors converge globally? People seek experiences and outlets that could enable them to cling to those things that are familiar to them, while enabling them to identify with like communities in the midst of ground-shaking social, technological, economic, and political changes. Heritage tourism is one of those social practices that produces a sense of centeredness through a complex negotiation and presentation of memory, art, and performance.

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Reviews

Susan Signe Morrison, Women Pilgrims in Late Medieval England: Private Piety as Public Performance Rosemary Tzanaki

Georgia Frank, The Memory of the Eyes. Pilgrims to Living Saints in Christian and Late Antiquity Ian Rutherford

Wes Williams, Pilgrimage and Narrative in the French Renaissance: ‘The Undiscovered Country’ Joan-Pau Rubiés

John Eade and Michael J. Sallnow (eds) Contesting the Sacred: The Anthropology of Christian Pilgrimage Marion Bowman

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Encounters with Authentic Embera Culture in Panama

Dimitrios Theodossopoulos

In this article I will compare indigenous cultural performances for outsiders in an allegedly 'inauthentic' Embera community in Panama, which welcomes tourists on a daily basis, with similar staged events in some other less accessible communities, which receive visitors much less frequently. I will challenge the idea introduced by several travellers who seek authentic experiences that the first community is 'unreal' and its repetitive representations of Embera culture are mechanical, sterile and unoriginal. I will argue that these repetitive cultural performances constitute real lived experiences, and do not deserve to be demeaned as inauthentic. I will further maintain that in the 'tourist' community, as well as in the less accessible settlements, the Embera respond to the same set of expectations. They imagine what Western visitors would appreciate from their culture and enact very similar representations of these generalised expectations.

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Introduction

Creating Shakespeare

Graham Holderness

Though it may seem perverse – Shakespeare being synonymous with creativity itself – to speak of ‘creating’ that which is already so manifestly and abundantly created, Shakespeare criticism and scholarship is tending increasingly towards the view that every act of scholarly reproduction, critical interpretation, theatrical performance, stage and screen adaptation, or fictional appropriation produces a new and hitherto unconceived Shakespeare. This volume presents discursive evidence to support this hypothesis in relation to the fields of transcultural reproduction, screen adaptation, theatrical improvisation and fictional re-writing.

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Editorial

Margaret Litvin

To my knowledge, this is the first essay collection in any language to be devoted to Arab appropriations of Shakespeare. Studies of international Shakespeare appropriation have mushroomed over the past fifteen to twenty years. Excitement began to build in the 1990s, as several lines of academic inquiry converged. Translation theorists found in Shakespeare’s plays a convenient (because widely known and prestigious) test case. Scholars in performance studies, having noted how sharply local context could influence a play’s staging and interpretation, saw a need to account for ‘intercultural’ performances of Shakespeare in various languages and locales. Marxist scholars became interested in the fetishisation of Shakespeare as a British cultural icon which, in turn, was used to confer cultural legitimacy on the project of capitalist empire-building. Scholars of postcolonial drama and literature explored how the periphery responded. The ‘new Europe’ provided another compelling set of examples. All this scholarship has developed quickly and with a great sense of urgency. Shakespeareans in many countries have contributed. By now there is a rich bibliography on Shakespeare appropriation in India, China, Japan, South Africa, Israel and many countries in Latin America and Eastern and Western Europe.

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Reviews

Maria Alziro Seixo (ed.) Travel Writing and Cultural Memory. Écriture du voyage et mémoire culturelle Kathryn Jones

Deirdre Coleman (ed.), Maiden Voyages and Infant Colonies: Two Women’s Travel Narratives of the 1790s Vanessa Smith

William Dampier A New Voyage Round the World: The Journal of an English Buccaneer Auguste Duhaut-Cilly A Voyage to California, the Sandwich Islands, & Around the World, in the Years 1826 – 1829 Alan Frost

Tim Edensor Tourists at the Taj: Performance and Meaning at a Symbolic Site Sarah Pink

David Farrell Krell and Donald L. Bates The Good European: Nietzsche’s Work Sites in Word and Image Martin Albrow

Fergus Fleming Barrow’s Boys Carl Thompson

Katie Hickman Daughters of Britannia: The Lives and Times of Diplomatic Wives Anabel Black

Curt McConnell Coast to Coast by Automobile: The Pioneering Trips, 1899–1908 Rudy Koshar

Joan-Pau Rubiés Travel and Ethnology in the Renaissance: South India through European Eyes 1250–1625 Inès Zupanov

Richard Wrigley and George Revill (eds) Pathologies of Travel Chris Wilbert