Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 1 of 1 items for :

  • "calculation" x
  • History of Ideology x
  • Democratization Studies x
  • Refine by Access: My content x
  • Refine by Content Type: Articles x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Juan M. del Nido

Wendy Brown’s (2015) warning that neoliberalism is a threat to democracy has for decades had a particularly literal resonance in Latin America. Neoliberalism here has become a byword for government-endorsed dispossession, extractivism, and environmental destruction (Hetherington 2020; Riofrancos 2020); the dismantling of the state (Shever 2012); and the physical violence and economic decimation of dictatorial rule (Han 2012; Whyte 2019: 156–197; Winn 2004). Academic discourse in and about Latin America tends to reduce neoliberalism to Marx’s famous description of capitalism’s icy waters and “cold and restricted . . . calculation” (Gago 2017: 10) promoted or acquiesced to by complicit, naive, corrupt, or powerless peripheral governments and a lumpenbourgeois elite. That foreign intervention in the continent in the name of democracy or its values often directly funded human rights violations only tightens the associations between neoliberalism, lack of democracy, and top-down projects.