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Introduction

Film Studies and Analytic Aesthetics in Dialogue

Mario Slugan and Enrico Terrone

, when it comes to the relationship between film and philosophy, the focus is mostly on how philosophy can help better understand film with little or nothing on how film studies can contribute to philosophical aesthetics. This special issue is aimed at

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Guest Editor's Introduction

Phenomenology Encounters Cognitivism

Robert Sinnerbrink

” problem still persists in film theory / philosophy of film, which means that efforts to address and overcome this opposition are as important as ever. Indeed, Smith's own conception of the need for a “triangulation” of aesthetic experience—recognizing the

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Ted Nannicelli

of Engagement shifts gears to a more traditional humanities approach with contributions from a philosopher with extensive experience writing about film and from three film theorists who frequently engage with and draw upon philosophy in their own

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Stephen Prince

dimensions of meaning and experience. Examining a wide range of films, he approaches the issue from the perspective of analytic philosophy and argues that the ways that viewers embody their sense of race through disgust reactions has implications for

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Stephen Prince

for the field. Scholars from cognitive science, literature, philosophy, and film studies assess the book’s impact. Its author, David Bordwell, replies to their remarks and shares his contemporary perspective on the book. I thank the participants in

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Ted Nannicelli

explores parallels between the philosophy of Baruch Spinoza (1632–1677) and contemporary work on 4e cognition (that is, cognition that is embodied, embedded, extended, and enacted). Using Lynne Ramsay's You Were Never Really Here (2017) as a case study

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Brian Bergen-Aurand

and disabled that draws our attention to the screen and our embodied experience of the bodies being screened. With these two blogs, the film, and Faix and colleagues’ article, then, we might begin to consider the history, philosophy, and methodology of

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Editorial

Screening Vulnerability

Brian Bergen-Aurand

specializes in nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature, visual culture, and continental philosophy. His work emphasizes matters of religion, ethics, and social justice. Saravanan Mani is completing his doctoral research in the Division of English