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Introduction

Toward a Queer Sinofuturism

Ari Heinrich, Howard Chiang, and Ta-wei Chi

of it. We've become the sign of it, the backdrop to it, and the style manual for it. — Aimee Bahng (2018) This special issue on “Queer Sinofuturisms” aims to explore how artists and writers working across various media in Sinophone contexts use

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Brian Bergen-Aurand

Screen Bodies 3.2 engages with a wide variety of topics—fat studies, contemporary queer cinema, (pre)posterity, puzzle films, grief and truth in filmmaking, feminist materialism, digitized bodies, food and horror, and Maghrebi cinema. As well, the selection of articles in this issue represents studies of several media—tv programs, films, publicity stills, and photographs—from a number of locations around the globe—North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. What holds this general issue together, though, is a concern over expectation, assumption, and supposition: what we suppose screens and bodies do and what we suppose they do not do. As usual, with this journal, the focus of this consideration is doublehanded: screen as projection and screen as prohibition. The articles below explore the duality of screens and our responses to them. They engage screening expectation as showing, exposing, divulging, and, at the same time, as testing, partitioning, and withholding. To screen expectation is to reveal and conceal it, and, as these articles argue—each in their own way—this process is what we all engage in when we engage with screening.

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Andrew J. Ball

regarded the body as “the fulcrum” between screen images and new image-production technologies. We continue, in a different register, to examine matters of audience reception in Julian Binder's “Close to You: Karen Carpenter and the Body-Martyr in Queer

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Andrew J. Ball

future, such as installation art, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, gaming, digital art, posthumanism, and film. And in keeping with the established emphases of the journal, these two issues feature the foremost innovations in queer theory, gender

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Editorial

Screening Vulnerability

Brian Bergen-Aurand

the time I first encountered Robert McRuer’s Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability soon after its publication in 2006, I began to turn my research and teaching from queer theory toward disability studies and crip theory. Or, it

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Introduction

Visibility and Screen Politics after the Transgender Tipping Point

Wibke Straube

certainly an important task to consider the homonormative, nationalist norms embedded in the romanticized ideal of trans and queer visibility. It might be time to abandon mainstream visibility politics, to follow the argument of the editors of the anthology

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Editorial

Situating Screen Bodies

Brian Bergen-Aurand

activist Zanele Muholi first conceptualized Inkanyiso as “a flexible and unique source of information for art advocacy” where queer activism = queer media. In 2009, Muholi registered the platform with the Department of Social Services “in response to the

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Brian Bergen-Aurand

femininity on edge and in transformation. Brought together with our reports on Genital Call and Genitals on Trial by Giegold and Weiß and the Inaugural Scottish Queer International Film Festival, as well as reviews of books and other media, this issue of

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Brian Bergen-Aurand

perfection of its own . Perhaps such a more complex “cognition of the senses” with regard to the study of screen bodies begins to arise from the evolution of feminist, LGBT, and queer theory in the 1980s. Perhaps, we can trace the percolation of those

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Guest Editor's Introduction

Phenomenology Encounters Cognitivism

Robert Sinnerbrink

; embodied spectatorship; aesthetics of “touch” (hapticity); gender and queer theories; and intersectional approaches. Whatever one's particular theoretical or practical commitments, however, it is worth noting that “applying” theory is not the same as