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Report. The World Social Forum on Migrations 2012

Consolidating efforts towards an equitable society

Shirlita Africa Espinosa

From the back alleys of Madrid to the financial capital of Singapore, the migration of peoples either to flee persecution or to pursue a high-stakes transnational job is a global phenomenon. One may even say that the one permanent presence these days is a temporary migrant. The mobility of workers—and the mobility that characterizes the social world in which they live—has always had an economic interpretation manifesting in the antagonism of locals against labor migrants. The issue of migration and the attendant discourses of citizenship, social cohesion, population, resource sharing, employment, criminality, and cultural differences, to mention a few, are a common specter often raised for political maneuvering. To use the migrant subject as a scapegoat for sundry social and economic ills of the “host” society—a term that perpetuates the stereotype of the migrant as parasitical, thus, creating a fitting formula for those who hold power—is integral to the production of their subjectivity as an unwanted sector of a society. Nevertheless, the centrality of migration today in the creation of wealth in advanced economies is very much tied to the role that migrants play in the development strategies of their own nations. Through the billions of dollars transferred through remi􀄴 ances, migration is regarded as the vehicle of development for countries in the South. But if exporting cheap and temporary labor remains inexpensive as it continues to support the growth of industrialized countries both in the manufacturing and service sectors, including the domestic and affective spheres of the home, then how does migration specifically drive the development of sending countries?

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Florian Krobb and Dorit Müller

experiences to a communicable level and, concurrently, the “voice of the Other” might become obscured beneath genre conventions, stereotypes, and fantasies. 15 Conversely, narratives of travel often function as an occasion for the incorporation of the strange

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Introduction

Autonomous Driving and the Transformation of Car Cultures

Jutta Weber and Fabian Kröger

self-driving cars still function as prostheses of male identity? Could autonomous automobility even degender the driver? Or will hegemonic masculinity merely be reconfigured in future mobility cultures? As history teaches us, gender stereotypes are

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Undoing Traceable Beginnings

Citizenship and Belonging among Former Burundian Refugees in Tanzania

Patricia Daley, Ng’wanza Kamata, and Leiyo Singo

widespread intermarriage among ethnic groups, and the lack of public discourse on ethnicity, even though ethnic stereotypes pervade social and cultural life, but, in most cases, are articulated as utani (jokes). People’s areas of origin and names might

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Giving Aid Inside the Home

Humanitarian House Visits, Performative Refugeehood, and Social Control of Syrians in Jordan

Ann-Christin Wagner

tangible assessment criteria. “Refugeeness” turned into a performance where neediness had to be demonstrated through short stereotypical narratives of flight and life in exile, but mostly visual markers of destitution. Despite VIVA’s anti

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Stephanie J. Silverman

scrutiny, securitization, and surveillance (e.g., Berns-McGown 2013 ; Giwa et al. 2014 ; Razack 2007 ; Sirin and Fine 2007 ). Academic, government, and media characterizations have stereotyped Somali-Canadians as violent outsiders who needed additional

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Christine Moderbacher

familiar streets in their neighborhood ( Mazzocchetti 2012: 3 ). The feelings of anger and injustice are enforced by dynamics of discrimination, racism, and the stereotypical images conveyed by, lately also international, media. Figure 2. Crossing

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Dirty Work, Dangerous Others

The Politics of Outsourced Immigration Enforcement in Mexico

Wendy Vogt

violence, insecurity, and economic precarity. In this context, Central American migrants, as gendered and racialized others, become easily stereotyped as criminals, delinquents, rapists, and kidnappers. Cultural crises and hysteria around immigrants

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Sabina Barone, Veronika Bernard, Teresa S Büchsel, Leslie Fesenmyer, Bruce Whitehouse, Petra Molnar, Bonny Astor, and Olga R. Gulina

victims or villains, providing very few counter-examples to these stereotypes. Despite his stated distrust of statistics, Judah peppers his account with figures that evoke tabloid headlines and UKIP political slogans. For instance, he makes the well

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Laborers, Migrants, Refugees

Managing Belonging, Bodies, and Mobility in (Post)Colonial Kenya and Tanzania

Hanno Brankamp and Patricia Daley

racial stereotyping and hierarchies meant that workers were defined by their aptitude for hard work. The Hutus from Burundi were stigmatized as “dirty” but also hard workers who could do the most arduous tasks on plantations. Hutus escaping racial