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Confronting Tyranny in a Public Health Agency

Crafting a ‘Philosophy of Praxis’ into a ‘Community of Resistance’

Brian McKenna

Gramsci’s philosophy of praxis is a theory of learning and education. Jean Lave, anthropologist 2012: 159 ) Introduction In June 1998 I was hired by the Ingham County Health Department in Lansing, Michigan to ‘turn the Public Health into the Peoples

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Annabel Erulkar and Girmay Medhin

, Powering Up Biruh Tesfa was the name given to a new initiative to expand the project in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital, focusing attention on measuring learning and health outcomes. The project was expanded to 17 of Addis Ababa’s 116 woredas (districts

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Ted Nannicelli

advanced by art historians Alois Riegl and Heinrich Wölfflin. To do this, they apply a machine-learning model to neurological data supplied by a set of fMRI scans. Methodology is the explicit topic of our third article, by Jose Cañas-Bajo, Teresa Cañas

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Heather Fitzsimmons Frey

: Ashgate . Neelands , Jonothan , and Bethany Nelson . 2013 . “ Drama, Community and Achievement: Together I’m Someone. ” Pp. 15 – 29 in How Drama Activates Learning: Contemporary Research and Practice , ed. Michael Anderson and Julie Dunn

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Making It Up

Intergenerational Activism and the Ethics of Empowering Girls

Emily Bent

not guarantee access to power or their political empowerment. Instead, girl-activists’ experiences illuminate the paradoxical limits of their exceptional (dis)empowerment. “Calling You Out” or Learning to Play the Game Sierra, a sixteen-year-old first

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Encountering Anthropology

An Exploratory Study of Degree Choice

David Bennett

Social anthropology in the U.K. is largely absent from the pre-university curriculum, contributing to the discipline's marginal status within higher education. My paper reports a small-scale empirical study of the transition to undergraduate anthropology as a socializing process that begins with the choice of discipline, continues as a learning experience and enables students to acquire elements of the discipline's 'culture'. The study identified 'chance' factors, serendipity and opportunism as important influences on choice of degree. These factors reflected the availability to applicants of cultural and economic capital. Students demonstrated varying degrees of socialization in identifying with anthropology's epistemological and social norms and values. My findings justify current attempts to increase the visibility of anthropology among pre-university students. They also support teaching initiatives that promote deep learning at undergraduate level. Both developments are necessary to sustain anthropology as a university discipline.

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Louis Jacobs

Our Rabbi and Teacher

Jonathan Wittenberg

The shock and sorrow of Rabbi Jacobs's passing bring with them the great sadness of the end of an era. As my colleague Rabbi Chaim Weiner said, we could always feel Rabbi Jacobs was there before us, or stood behind us, with his immense knowledge and authority. He made us safe, as a parent makes a child feel safe. Now he's departed from us, and with him are gone his learning, teaching, wisdom and his humour, his great tolerance and his impassioned integrity.

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Anthropology and the International Baccalaureate

History, Practice and Future Challenges

Marzia Balzani

The article contextualizes the educational, political and social context in which the International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma programme was established and describes the place of social anthropology within the general aims of the diploma programme as a whole. The article then discusses the current diploma curriculum for social and cultural anthropology and the issues arising from this for the teaching and learning of anthropology in a global context, including teacher support and comparisons with other national pre-university educational qualifications. Some of the perceptions of the IB diploma among teachers, students and parents are also briefly discussed.

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India travels and transitioning Luxembourg

Appropriate thresholds and scales of change

Katy Fox

This is a new year’s letter written by the founder of the Centre for Ecological Learning Luxembourg (CELL) to the executive board on the occasion of a journey to India. CELL is an independent, volunteer-led grassroots nonprofit organization founded in 2010 and based in Beckerich. CELL’s scope of action is the Greater Region of Luxembourg, hence its mode of operating through decentralized action groups in order to establish and maintain community gardens, food co-ops, and other social-ecological projects in different parts of Luxembourg. CELL also develops and organizes various courses, provides consultancy services for ecological living, participates in relevant civil society campaigns, and does some practical research on low-impact living. The broad objective of CELL is to provide an experimental space for thinking, researching, disseminating, and practicing lifestyles with a low impact on the environment, and learning the skills for creating resilient post-carbon communities. CELL is inspired by the work of the permaculture and Transition Towns social movements in its aims to relocalize culture and economy and, in that creative process, improve resilience to the consequences of peak oil and climate change.

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Participation, Process and Partnerships

Climate Change and Long-term Stakeholder Engagement

Carrie Furman, Wendy-Lin Bartels, and Jessica Bolson

As awareness of the potential threats posed by climate change increases, researchers and agricultural advisors are being called upon to determine the risks that different stakeholder groups will likely confront and to develop adaptive strategies. Yet, engaging with stakeholders takes time. It also requires a clear and detailed plan to ensure that research and outreach activities yield useful outputs. In this article, we focus on the role of anthropologists as researchers and conveners in stakeholder engagement and provide a generalised overview of a long-term engagement process proceeding in three stages: (1) fact-finding and relationship- building; (2) incubation and collaborative learning; and (3) informed engagement and broad dissemination. We conclude with a discussion of perspectives and challenges that were encountered during two engagement experiences in the south-eastern United States.