Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 148 items for :

Clear All
Open access

Learning the Elsewhere of ‘Inner Space’

The Affective Pedagogy of Post-Secular Sufi Healing in Germany

Nasima Selim

to bloom That which destroys us This torn apart Undivided earth On which We travel together.   — Rose Ausländer, “ Gemeinsam /Together” Each year, many Inayati Sufis gather for a summer school in a village in northern Germany that

Free access

Sounds German?

Popular Music in Postwar Germany at the Crossroads of the National and Transnational

Kirkland A. Fulk

A musical undercurrent has long permeated German culture and intellectual life. For more than a century, theories and practices of folk, art, and classical music—variously understood both in their mutual interrelation and as entirely distinct

Open access

"Wir Sind Das Volk"

Narrative Identity and the Other in the Discourse of the PEGIDA Movement

Adrian Paukstat and Cedric Ellwanger

PEGIDA, the self-proclaimed ‘Patriotic Europeans against the Islamization of the Occident’ movement is a highly debated topic in Germany. Over the course of the refugee crisis it has become clear that this movement would not perish as quickly as many analysts thought. The authors investigated PEGIDA's narrative identity (Ricoeur 2005) in relation to their conceptions of Self and Other, using Keller's (2008) Sociology of Knowledge Approach to Discourse (SKAD). In this, the authors utilize discourse-related paradigms to reconstruct subject positions and narrative identities, as articulated in public speeches and commentary of PEDGIDA supporters in 2014-5. Beyond the issue of PEGIDA itself, this study aims to introduce new paradigms on collective political identity, which can also shed new light on the issue of populist movements in a time of a legitimacy crisis of the European Union and the growing numbers seeking refuge in Europe.

Full access

Louise K. Davidson-Schmich

countrymen and women have enjoyed. 2 Sexual minorities are just that, a very small—and, at times, disliked—portion of the electorate, and parties may see little utility to courting their votes. Instead, many advances in lgbti rights in Germany and

Free access

Claire Sutherland

This special issue sets out to examine aspects of German politics, philosophy,

and society through the multifaceted lens of cosmopolitanism. A complex

and contested concept, cosmopolitanism has particularly important

implications for the study of contemporary nation-states, as conventional

understandings of bounded territory and sovereignty are reassessed in the

context of globalization, migration and transnationalism. Accordingly, this

introduction aims to outline several key strands of cosmopolitan thought

with reference both to contemporary Germany and the wider global conjuncture,

in order to provide a conceptual framework for the articles that

follow. It begins by briefly placing cosmopolitanism in the context of the

evolving concepts of German Heimat (homeland) and nation, because contemporary

cosmopolitanism can only be fully understood in relation to

nationalism. It then looks at the relevance of methodological, political and

ethical cosmopolitanism for the study of nation-states today, before introducing

the five articles in the special issue.

Free access

John S. Brady and Sarah Elise Wiliarty

In December 1995, the Center for German and European Studies at

the University of California at Berkeley hosted the conference, “The

Postwar Transformation of Germany: Prosperity, Democracy, and

Nationhood.” During the proceedings and in the edited volume that

resulted, conference contributors explored the reasons for Germany’s

success in making the transition to a liberal democratic polity

supported by a rationalized national identity and a modern, dynamic

capitalist economy. In charting postwar Germany’s success, the contributors

weighed the relative contribution institutional, cultural, and

international variables made to the country’s transformation.

Free access

Triadafilos Triadafilopoulos

This special issue of German Politics and Society offers a retrospective look at

the German Citizenship Act (Staatsangehörigkeitsgesetz, StAG), which passed in

1999 and came into force in 2000.1 The law was and continues to be understood

by many academics, policymakers, and lay commentators as constituting

a “paradigm shift” in German citizenship policy and, by extension,

prevailing conceptions of German nationhood. The introduction of the law

of territory (jus soli), in particular, was greeted as a welcome acknowledgement

of Germany’s de facto status as a modern immigration country. Children

born and raised in Germany would no longer be rendered permanent

foreigners as a consequence of the dominance of the law of descent (jus sanguinis)

in the Reichs- und Staatsangehörigkeitsgesetz (RuStAG), 1913. Proponents

assumed that the reduction of the residency requirement for naturalization

would also allow greater numbers of long settled immigrants to assume the

rights and privileges of German nationality. Just as importantly, Germany

would join the European mainstream as regarded citizenship policy. The

stigma associated with its traditionally ethnic conception of nationhood

would give way to a more positive, civic identity.

Free access

Jutta A. Helm

For more than a century, Germany has had a well-balanced system

of cities showcasing considerable variety in their social and physical

make-up. It has lacked spectacular global cities like New York,

Tokyo, or London. Instead, western cities include industrial cities

like those in the Rhine-Ruhr Valley and cities shaped by universities

and research (Göttingen or Freiburg), media and publishing (Hamburg),

culture and high-technology sectors (Munich), banking and

finance (Frankfurt/Main), wholesale trade and insurance (Cologne

and Düsseldorf), as well as government and administration (Berlin,

Bonn, and most state capitals). Dramatic social or economic crises

that generate debates about urban decline have not happened.

Thanks in part to effective urban governments, no German city has

come close to the near-collapse of American rustbelt cities during

the early 1980s, or the fiscal meltdown of New York City in the

1970s. Crime has been consistently lower and less violent, and the

American racial divide has no equivalent in German cities. East German

cities, while more unevenly developed, have been no less stable.

East Berlin was the dominant center, linked to the industrial

cities in the North (Rostock) and South (Leipzig, Halle, Dresden) by

a rather creaky infrastructure.

Free access

Francesca Vassallo

The Élysée Treaty turned fifty on 22 January 2013—signed in 1963

between France and Germany, under the watchful eyes of French President

Charles de Gaulle and West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer.

Although celebrated every decade, this particular anniversary comes at a

crucial time in the countries’ bilateral relationship. After a few tumultuous

years of disagreement and distance between Paris and Berlin over serious

economic and foreign policy issues, German Chancellor Angela Merkel

and French President François Hollande have seized the opportunity of

the year-long anniversary calendar to work on political rapprochement, in

the spirit of one of the original purposes of the Treaty itself.

Free access

Asiye Kaya

The year 2011 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the bilateral recruitment

agreement that the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) signed with

the Republic of Turkey in 1961. According to official figures, the immigrant

group with roots in Turkey and its offspring make the second largest

group currently after ethnic German emigrants (resettlers) in Germany.

Understanding this migration experience and the broader issues of immigration

in Germany is the motivation behind this special issue.