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Report from the Region

The “Anti-Gender” Wave Contested: Gender Studies, Civil Society, and the State in Eastern Europe and Beyond*

kindergarten children), similarly aggressive anti-immigration discourse or anti-Muslim racism in particular and aggressive responses to other feminist discourses and policies, on the other. Fourth, as this dual “argument” unfolds we witness, in parallel, the

Open access

Becoming Communist

Ideals, Dreams, and Nightmares

Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild

early days, through attempts to perfect the behavior of those at the Lenin School and purge them of racism, classism, and sexism, to the lived experience in Spain during the civil war, to the general fight against fascism during World War II, to the

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Public Health in Eastern Europe

Visible Modernization and Elusive Gender Transformation

Evguenia Davidova

; eating habits and alcoholism; specific illnesses that afflicted the rural population (pellagra); and racial degeneration. It was the latter that coalesced anxieties of depopulation with nationalism, racism, and anti-Semitism. Within this amalgam

Open access

Kristen Ghodsee, Hülya Adak, Elsa Stéphan, Chiara Bonfiglioli, Ivan Stankov, Rumiana Stoilova, Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild, Mara Lazda, Adrienne Harris, Ayşe Durakbaşa, Lex Heerma van Voss, Lejila Mušić, Zdeňka Kalnická, Sylwia Kuźma-Markowska, Evguenia Davidova, Tsoneva Tsoneva, Georgi Medarov, and Irina Genova

the 1960s and 1970s) and extending it into the twenty-first century. World War II, the defeat of fascism, intensified struggles against imperialism and racism, and growing conflict between capitalism and communism were all shifts in power hierarchies

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Maria Bucur, Alexandra Ghit, Ayşe Durakbaşa, Ivana Pantelić, Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild, Elizabeth A. Wood, Anna Müller, Galina Goncharova, Zorana Antonijević, Katarzyna Sierakowska, Andrea Feldman, Maria Kokkinou, Alexandra Zavos, Marija M. Bulatović, Siobhán Hearne, and Rayna Gavrilova

University Press, 2018, 487 pp., BGN 16 (paperback), ISBN: 978-954-07-4474-2. Book review by Galina Goncharova Department of Cultural Studies, St. Kliment Ohridski University of Sofia, Bulgaria Since the mid-1990s, the question “Is there fascism/racism

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Joel Modiri

, and social sciences. Parts 3 and 4 sketch out in broad strokes some of the essential theoretical tenets and assumptions of Azanian social and political thought, with particular focus on the framing and conceptualisation of ‘South Africa’, race/racism

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Theorising Race

Imagining Possibilities

Kira Erwin and Gerhard Maré

This special issue emerges from a concern with academic practice around researching and theorising race, racialism and racism; particularly within the current theoretical climate in which race is, in the majority, accepted as a social construct. In public thinking and discourse, however, acceptance of the biological existence of races continues to dominate in many societies. Racial classification also continues in many state practices in South Africa such as the collection of racial demographics though the national census, and through countless private and public officials reporting towards government-stipulated race-based employment acts. These classification practices raise contradictions for the constitutional goal of non-racialism in South Africa. South Africa has also signed and ratified the International Convention for the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Professional Interest/Pages/CERD.aspx), which aims to eliminate racial discrimination in member states. The convention, to which member states are legally bound, raises a number of pressing issues that, to date, are not present in a wider national debate on the continued use of race in South African state policy. For example, there is little recognition by the state of the difficulties associated with identifying a targeted group based on race, nor clarity as to whether these groups are identified through markers based on phenotype, or socio-economic or cultural differences. Nor is there open discussion on the use of terms such as fair and unfair discrimination and how they relate to terms such as distinction and differentiation (see Bossuyt 2000), and the legal consequences of using such terms.

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Introduction

Traces of Pan Africanism and African Nationalism in Africa Today

Denis Goldberg

and redeem themselves as Africans. W.E.B. du Bois, an African American and a Marxist, was sure that modern racism and the subjugation of black people was a direct result of capitalist labour relations, the quest for markets and raw materials and

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Ndumiso Dladla

, among other things, addressed the methodological consequences of racism in the study of Africa's past. There he shows the stubbornness of the Hamitic myth which has seen scientists ignoring entire bodies of material evidence when studying Africa's past

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Anjuli Webster

, the exceptionalisation of apartheid in South African historiography has obfuscated the origins of the consolidation of settler racism and white supremacy through the social sciences in the early twentieth century. This historical revisionism and