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Erella Grassiani, Alexander Horstmann, Lotte Buch Segal, Ronald Stade, and Henrik Vigh

Violence, defined as the intentional inflicting of injury and damage, seems to always have been a fact of human life. Whether in the shape of raids, ambushes, wars, massacres, genocides, insurgences, terrorism, or gang assaults, socially organized violence, that is, human groups orchestrating and committing violent acts, has been a steady companion of human life through the ages. The human quest to make sense of violence is probably as old as violence itself. Academic conflict research both continues and advances this quest. As long as wars were waged between nations, the research on armed conflicts focused on international relations and great power politics. This paradigm was kept alive even when the asymmetrical warfare of decolonization spread across the world, because by then the frame of analysis was the binary system of the Cold War and regional conflicts were classifi ed as proxy wars. After the end of the Cold War, the academic interest in forms of organized violence other than international conflict became more general in the social sciences, not least in anthropology, a discipline whose long-standing research interest in violent conflict previously had been directed almost exclusively towards “tribal warfare.” But, following their research tradition, anthropologists also began to conduct field studies in contemporary war zones and other violent settings.

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Introduction

Exceptionalism and Necropolitical Security Dynamics in Olympic Rio de Janeiro

Margit Ystanes and Tomas Salem

is blind to the current workings of race and racism among the population. Such “pedagogical amnesia” is not unique to Norway but is currently contested by an increasing number of scholars around the world, who call for the decolonization of knowledge

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Introduction

The Digital Age Opens Up New Terrains for Peace and Conflict Research

Josepha Ivanka Wessels

-state has ceased to exist after the process of decolonization. Finally, cyberspace offers a context for the deposit of digital memorials for victims and casualties of war from any adversary in a conflict. The three articles of this special section were

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Richard Meissner and Jeroen Warner

decolonization of Namibia, for which Angola allowed its territory as a shelter for the South West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO) resistance movement, which, after independence became Namibia's ruling party ( Meissner, 2016 ). Although the subsequent

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Leyla Neyzi, Nida Alahmad, Nina Gren, Martha Lagace, Chelsey Ancliffe, and Susanne Bregnbæk

Rights, and the Economic Culture of Decolonization . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press . 10.1017/9781316717493 Hiltermann , Joost R. 2007 . Poisonous Affair: America, Iraq, and the Gassing of Halabja . Cambridge : Cambridge University

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Alena Minchenia

.4159/9780674495548 Carothers , Thomas . 2009 . “ Democracy Assistance: Political vs. Developmental? ” Journal of Democracy 20 ( 1 ): 5 – 19 . https://doi.org/10.1353/jod.0.0047 10.1353/jod.0.0047 Chabot , Sean , and Stellan Vinthagen . 2015 . “ Decolonizing