Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 184 items for :

  • Anthropology x
Clear All
Open access

Active learning in criminal justice

The benefits of student investigation of wrongful convictions in a higher education setting

Jill Dealey

Advocates of active learning in higher education applaud the use of approaches that encourage student involvement in research and inquiry and state that it is the most effective means of enabling a move away from more traditional (and now less

Open access

Learning the Elsewhere of ‘Inner Space’

The Affective Pedagogy of Post-Secular Sufi Healing in Germany

Nasima Selim

lies between Hanover and Hamburg, a few hundred kilometers from Berlin. Since its initiation in 2002, the summer school makes available the teaching and learning of ‘Universal’ Sufism in Europe, a tradition established by the North Indian Chishti Sufi

Open access

Shih-Hsiung Liu

information ( Rogoff 1990 ; Vygotsky 1978 ). Teacher education students who undertake dialogue-based learning for education-related topics may potentially develop a more profound understanding than students who do not. Dialogue-based peer learning (DBPL

Open access

Anxiety and learning

Cultural polarisation in social science courses

Jose Leonardo Santos

confusion, then terror, then tears. Something about these issues triggered her. I felt bad. Later, I wondered how emotional responses influence learning. If this student was so shaken by the class topic, could she have truly absorbed lessons about

Free access

Bonnie Urciuoli

Service learning and other engaged scholarship programmes ideally operate in an academic framework to enhance student understanding of citizenship and community engagement. In reality, given the constraints on institutional budgets, such programmes are likely to be underfunded and academically understaffed. Structured as choices on an institutional menu, programmes are routinely touted as transformative though what they transform may be indeterminate. The ways in which such programmes are presented encourage students to interpret transformation as personal experience, valued to the extent that students can do good in the world by acting as agents of progress, solving problems for people imagined to need their expertise, ideally in exotic settings as unlike students' routine lives as possible, while students develop skills and connections useful in their post-college careers. This construction of engaged scholarship readily lends itself to institutional promotional language but can undermine students' effective action in actual projects.

Open access

Becoming a global citizen?

Developing community-facing learning in the social sciences

Jane Booth

volunteering, placement activity and study abroad, is attractive for higher education institutions. Indeed, the QAA and HEA argue for ‘place-based learning’ where ‘students work in collaboration with local communities, public sector bodies, businesses and

Open access

Daring spaces

Creating multi-sensory learning environments

Sabine Krajewski and Matthew Khoury

into online learning, but it has also revealed many shortcomings because of the digital divide, unfulfilled expectations and obstacles impossible to prepare for. Dreaming of flexible physical learning spaces might be daring in times where virtual spaces

Open access

Penny Welch and Susan Wright

In this issue of Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences , authors from Denmark, the United States, Taiwan and the United Kingdom analyse serendipity in anthropology teaching, the use of lecture

Open access

Penny Welch and Susan Wright

In this issue of Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences , authors from a range of academic disciplines – music therapy, political geography, social policy, international communications and law

Free access

Making the best of an inappropriate textbook

Using an ‘international edition’ to teach critical thinking and intercultural understanding

Kristina C. Marcellus

length about the changes in wider Egyptian society that had affected the way that education in their country is done. Students were very aware that models of teaching and learning, such as rote memorisation, that relied upon standardised testing for