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Active learning in criminal justice

The benefits of student investigation of wrongful convictions in a higher education setting

Jill Dealey

Advocates of active learning in higher education applaud the use of approaches that encourage student involvement in research and inquiry and state that it is the most effective means of enabling a move away from more traditional (and now less

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Shih-Hsiung Liu

information ( Rogoff 1990 ; Vygotsky 1978 ). Teacher education students who undertake dialogue-based learning for education-related topics may potentially develop a more profound understanding than students who do not. Dialogue-based peer learning (DBPL

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Anxiety and learning

Cultural polarisation in social science courses

Jose Leonardo Santos

confusion, then terror, then tears. Something about these issues triggered her. I felt bad. Later, I wondered how emotional responses influence learning. If this student was so shaken by the class topic, could she have truly absorbed lessons about

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Through Our Eyes

Using Photovoice to Address Stigma in the Age of AIDS

Learning Together Project

Learning Together Project

Th e photographs in this essay were taken by grade eight and nine girls in one rural school in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa in response to the question: What is the face of stigma in our community in the context of HIV and Aids? Th e girls used inexpensive point-and-shoot cameras to document the issues on location at their school, staging scenes that tell critical stories of the impact of stigma on the community. Once they had taken the photographs they developed captions which speak to the issues that they were working to represent. Some wrote in isiZulu while others chose to write in English. Th e isiZulu captions were translated into English. The images in this photovoice project help to identify, understand and interpret incidents related to stigma and discrimination against people living with, and aff ected by, HIV and AIDS.

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Bonnie Urciuoli

Service learning and other engaged scholarship programmes ideally operate in an academic framework to enhance student understanding of citizenship and community engagement. In reality, given the constraints on institutional budgets, such programmes are likely to be underfunded and academically understaffed. Structured as choices on an institutional menu, programmes are routinely touted as transformative though what they transform may be indeterminate. The ways in which such programmes are presented encourage students to interpret transformation as personal experience, valued to the extent that students can do good in the world by acting as agents of progress, solving problems for people imagined to need their expertise, ideally in exotic settings as unlike students' routine lives as possible, while students develop skills and connections useful in their post-college careers. This construction of engaged scholarship readily lends itself to institutional promotional language but can undermine students' effective action in actual projects.

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Penny Welch and Susan Wright

In this issue of Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences , authors from Denmark, the United States, Taiwan and the United Kingdom analyse serendipity in anthropology teaching, the use of lecture

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Making the best of an inappropriate textbook

Using an ‘international edition’ to teach critical thinking and intercultural understanding

Kristina C. Marcellus

length about the changes in wider Egyptian society that had affected the way that education in their country is done. Students were very aware that models of teaching and learning, such as rote memorisation, that relied upon standardised testing for

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Barbara Robertson and Mark J. Flowers

the learning management system as a supplement to the traditional lecture already given ( Bollmeier et al. 2010 ; Bryans Bongey et al. 2006 ; Choi and Johnson 2005 ; Cramer et al. 2007 ; Evans 2014 ; Maag 2004 ; Rogers and Cordell 2011 ; Rose

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Introduction

Constructing and practising student engagement in changing institutional cultures

Lisa Garforth and Anselma Gallinat

This special issue of Learning and Teaching explores student engagement in the context of recent rapid reforms in English higher education. The Browne Review ( Browne 2010 ) and the subsequent government White Paper (BIS 2011) led to the

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Sam Pryke

articles on Socrative use in higher education that have been published in teaching and learning journals over the last seven years, in itself a reflection of the popularity of the Web-based platform. In doing so, I also make some reference to the