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John Ireland and Constance Mui

a truly popular forum, the importance of Brecht as a model of politically engaged theater, etc.), the tone of the two interviews (the first in particular) is different, as Sartre seeks to connect with a socialist audience. These interviews also break

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Adrian van den Hoven

This collection of twenty-one articles by thirteen American, six British, and two Canadian scholars is divided into four sections: Sartre and Philosophy; Sartre and Psychology; Sartre: (Auto)biography, Theater, and Cinema; and, finally, Sartre and Politics. The great diversity of approaches and commentaries is a tribute to the stature of Sartre, whose writings continue to have an impact on the English-speaking world and farther afield.

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Several important facets of Sartre’s work are exemplified in this issue of Sartre Studies International: on the one hand, the range and variety of his intellectual and literary achievements (methodological innovation, political intervention, amorous discourse and theatrical exploration); on the other, his interactions with other key intellectuals (specifically, Lefebvre, Camus and de Beauvoir) that were the source of a productive and challenging re-evaluation and reassessment.

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The first issue of volume four of Sartre Studies International exemplifies the full range of Sartre’s intellectual output: literary, philosophical and political. Three articles by Colin Davis, Edward Greenwood and Paul Reed are centred on the multiple interactions in Sartre’s work between philosophy and literature. In a penetrating analysis of Sartre’s Le Mur, Colin Davis explores the complex relationship between ethics and fiction, between Moral Law and jouissance. ‘The lie of Sartre’s narrator in “Le Mur”’, contends Davis, ‘represents a way of sharing the pain of his/her powerlessness and mortality’, and is coincidental with ‘an assault through fiction on the reader whose power to judge and comprehend is wrested away’.

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David Detmer and John Ireland

This issue of Sartre Studies International underscores Sartre’s extraordinary versatility, as it contains groundbreaking research and informative writing on his activities in politics, literature, and philosophy. By focusing on two pivotal events

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Editorial

Thinking with Sartre

Edited by John H. Gillespie and Sarah Richmond

political theory. This breadth and diversity are reflected in the articles of this issue, which consider the theory of the novel, fantasy and literature, phenomenology and perception, politics, women’s rights and existentialist thinking in general. Adrian

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John Ireland and Constance Mui

judgment and offers a striking illustration of the expanding range of intellectual, political and artistic concerns to which Sartre’s writings and ideas continue ( pace Sartre) to be applied. Let’s begin with the political. Perhaps the biggest surprise of

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John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

shows how he moves to follow the Beauvoirian notion of the ‘situation’ in his thinking on gender in The Critique of Dialectical Reason and The Family Idiot , now taking account of how social, economic and political conditions can inhibit freedom

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John Gillespie and Sarah Richmond

political commitment are clearly still valuable today. However, it is clear that the controversies discussed are not merely ‘academic’ matters, but rather concern highly practical moral and political challenges. This is poignantly evident since this

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Edited by Ârash Aminian Tabrizi, Kate Kirkpatrick, and Marieke Mueller

Sartre’s texts, we welcomed new approaches to Sartre which took his thought as a starting point to engage current issues – literary and philosophical but also political, religious, psychological. It has not been possible to publish all the conference