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Queer Sinofuturism

The Aberrant Movements and Posthumanist Mutations of Body, Identity, and Matter in Lu Yang's Uterus Man

Gabriel Remy-Handfield

inherent queerness present in the video; indeterminacy is already implied in the title of the film. The character possesses different abilities and weapons, all related to a different part of the uterus associated with the feminine body . Lu Yang created a

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Close to You

Karen Carpenter and the Body-Martyr in Queer Memory

Julian Binder

” and mundane image, the Carpenters have left a legacy that has endured and been subject to constructions of memory and reproduction in unlikely, queer places—and this is especially true of the Karen Carpenter legacy in the years following her death in

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Jess Dorrance

goes, how she is seen or used, and with whom she affiliates. In response, she blames herself. This article thinks with and about Boudry and Lorenz's film and accompanying installation Toxic in order to reflect upon the politics of racialized queer

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Transitions Within Queer North African Cinema

Nouri Bouzid, Abdellah Taïa, and the Transnational Tourist

Walter S. Temple

In recent years, North African queer cinema has become increasingly visible both within and beyond Arabo-Orientale spaces. A number of critical factors have contributed to a global awareness of queer identities in contemporary Maghrebi cinema

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Introduction

Toward a Queer Sinofuturism

Ari Heinrich, Howard Chiang, and Ta-wei Chi

of it. We've become the sign of it, the backdrop to it, and the style manual for it. — Aimee Bahng (2018) This special issue on “Queer Sinofuturisms” aims to explore how artists and writers working across various media in Sinophone contexts use

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The New Imitation Game

The Queer Sinitic Potentialities of Internet Romance Games

Carlos Rojas

nature, invites an exploration of an array of queer potentialities, wherein the inherent fluidity of gender assignments and attendant sexual orientations works in tension with the more limited understanding of gender and sexuality that characterizes the

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Voicing Pride and Futurity in the Age of A.I.

An Interview with Playwright Pao-Chang Tsai on Solo Date

Jing Chen and Pao-Chang Tsai

between Ho Nien and Alain in the underworld, alluding to an alternative space to imagine the future. Through the lens of queer articulation in a Sinophone context, Solo Date embodies the discursive practices of “Queer Sinofuturisms” pointed to by Ari

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On Sinofuturism

Resisting Techno-Orientalism in Understanding Kuaishou, Douyin, and Chinese A.I.

Yunying Huang

popular culture. In this article, I discuss representatives of Chinese popular culture that may not be familiar to outside audiences— wanghong style (internet celebrity style), tu style (rustic style), queer expression (in particular nv zhuang da lao

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“Banal Apocalypse”

An Interview with Author Ta-wei Chi on the New Translation of The Membranes

Jane Chi Hyun Park and Ta-wei Chi

of queer Taiwanese speculative fiction, and I had the opportunity to interview the author about some of these themes. The interview that follows is based on a series of email exchanges between Ta-wei and myself in 2019 and 2020. My role was that of a

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Brian Bergen-Aurand

Screen Bodies 3.2 engages with a wide variety of topics—fat studies, contemporary queer cinema, (pre)posterity, puzzle films, grief and truth in filmmaking, feminist materialism, digitized bodies, food and horror, and Maghrebi cinema. As well, the selection of articles in this issue represents studies of several media—tv programs, films, publicity stills, and photographs—from a number of locations around the globe—North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. What holds this general issue together, though, is a concern over expectation, assumption, and supposition: what we suppose screens and bodies do and what we suppose they do not do. As usual, with this journal, the focus of this consideration is doublehanded: screen as projection and screen as prohibition. The articles below explore the duality of screens and our responses to them. They engage screening expectation as showing, exposing, divulging, and, at the same time, as testing, partitioning, and withholding. To screen expectation is to reveal and conceal it, and, as these articles argue—each in their own way—this process is what we all engage in when we engage with screening.