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Melanie Kennedy and Natalie Coulter

and the discussions that followed, then, remind us of the cultural visibility of tweenhood, and that the subject of the tween—one bound up with deep-rooted assumptions about race, beauty, and consumer culture—is a site onto and through which

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Overlapping Time and Place

Early Modern England’s Girlhood Discourse and Indigenous Girlhood in the Dominion of Canada (1684-1860)

Haidee Smith Lefebvre

the content, I use the terms Aboriginal, Indian, and Native. My article hangs on one essay, A Strong Race Opinion: On the Indian Girl in Modern Fiction published in 1892 by Emily Pauline Johnson Tekahionwake 2 (1861–1913), the daughter of a

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“Something Good Distracts Us from the Bad”

Girls Cultivating Disruption

Crystal Leigh Endsley

better be good. We were going to spend that afternoon making use of a literary and feminist tradition designed to explore how girls “engage with the complex identificatory possibilities … to negotiate their gendered, raced, classed, and sexed identities

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Sami Schalk

, class, and race in various parts of the American Girl brand, none have discussed disability. 1 Girl of the Year: American Girl Contemporary Fiction American Girl’s ablenationalism can be traced first through their fictional texts. American Girl’s Girl of

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Rethinking Agency and Resistance

What Comes After Girl Power?

Marnina Gonick, Emma Renold, Jessica Ringrose, and Lisa Weems

With the current proliferation of images and narratives of girls and girlhood in popular culture, many ‘truths’ about girls circulate with certainty. Amongst the aims of this Special Issue is to examine critically these ‘confi dent characterizations’ (Trinh 1989), to trace the social conditions which produce these ‘truths’ along with the public fascination with girls and to analyze critically the eff ects of these ‘truths’ in the lives of young girls. Th e concepts of resistance and agency have been critical to the field of youth studies, sociology of education and school ethnographies (Hall and Jeff erson 1976; McRobbie 1978; Willis 1978) for conceptualizing the relationships between young people and their social worlds. Ground breaking scholarship by McRobbie (2000) challenges the gendered assumptions of political agency articulated in previous theories of subcultures developed in the 1970s and 80s. While feminist poststructuralist work in the 1990s has re-conceptualized agency in ways that are markedly diff erent to humanist notions of rational actors with free-will (Butler 2006; Davies 2000), feminist researchers have also shown the importance of a classed, raced and sexed analysis of agency. For example, scholarship by feminists of color have shown how girls of color challenge and defy dominant stereotypes of girlhood in culturally specifi c ways such as participating in spokenword contests, rap and hip hop, and ‘beauty contests’ (Hernandez and Rehman 2002; Gaunt 2006). In the changing social, economic, political and globalizing context of the new millennium, where ‘girl power’ has become a marketing tool and a branding (Klein 2000) of girlhood, it is important to look anew at the relations between girlhood, power, agency and resistance.

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Dayna Prest

, neoliberalism, gender, race, and class to demonstrate how classed, raced, and gendered literate subjectivities are connected to the neoliberal social and economic contexts in which we live. In this rendition of the methodology the students were asked to write

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I’m Not Loud, I’m Outspoken

Narratives of Four Jamaican Girls’ Identity and Academic Success

Rowena Linton and Lorna McLean

herstory, culture, race, class, gender, and other forms of oppression in understanding black women. Black feminism operates on the guiding premise that academic knowledge and personal histories must be integrated in theorizing black women’s experiences to

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Working Hard, Hanging Back

Constructing the Achieving Girl

Colette Slagle

with class, race, and sexuality. The next chapter describes the trajectory of the “girls work hard” (98) narrative as a current day meritocratic ideal. She argues that some girls manage their competing gendered and achieving identities by

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Smart Girl Identity

Possibilities and Implications

Bernice Loh

t girls. They recognize that not all girls who do w ell at school do so in the terms outlined in media stories of post-feminist girlhoods because of intersecting personal and social factors such as socio-economic class, race, age, and nationality

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Reframing Disability through Graphic Novels for Girls

Alternative Bodies in Cece Bell’s El Deafo

Wendy Smith-D’Arezzo and Janine Holc

format, but also as an expression of a new approach to the portrayal of disability in literature for young readers. Bell uses graphic novel techniques to create a representation of girlhood in which gender, disability, race, age, and class intersect in a