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Sandrina de Finney, Patricia Krueger-Henney and Lena Palacios

We are deeply honored to have been given the opportunity to edit this special issue of Girlhood Studies, given that it is dedicated to rethinking girlhood in the context of the adaptive, always-evolving conditions of white settler regimes. The contributions to this issue address the need to theorize girlhood—and critiques of girlhood—across the shifting forces of subjecthood, community, land, nation, and borders in the Western settler states of North America. As white settler states, Canada and the United States are predicated on the ongoing spatial colonial occupation of Indigenous homelands. In settler states, as Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang remind us, “the settler never left” (2012: 20) and colonial domination is reasserted every day of active occupation. White settler colonialism functions through the continued control of land, resources, and racialized bodies, and is amalgamated through a historical commitment to slavery, genocide, and the extermination of Indigenous nationhood and worldviews. Under settler colonial regimes, criminal justice, education, immigration, and child welfare systems represent overlapping sites of transcarceral power that amplify intersecting racialized, gendered, sexualized, and what Tanja Aho and colleagues call “carceral ableist” violence (2017: 291). This transcarceral power is enacted through institutional and bureaucratic warfare such as, for example, the Indian Act, the school-to-prison pipeline, and the child welfare system to deny, strategically, Indigenous claims to land and the citizenship of racial others.

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Social Movements and Social Policies

Political Challenges under Austerity in the UK

Gregory White

The economic crisis of 2007/2008 presented a challenge to the welfare state in the UK, and, more widely, across Europe. It also presented a challenge to many citizens, who were on the receiving end of the austerity agenda, and subsequent tightening of welfare spending. If nothing else, the financial crisis demonstrated the hegemony of economic theories prominent in neoliberal capitalism. As many academics and commentators have identified, however, the current period of instability is indicative of a systemic crisis. In addition to this analysis, the crisis also exposed the intricate and opaque links between western governments and the financial sector. During and after the crisis an eruption of activity in civil society galvanized many that had been directly affected by either the crisis itself—through loss of employment—or by the subsequent austerity measures imposed. This article aims to examine the current crisis affecting the welfare state in the UK, and social policy more broadly, and, begins to suggest how social movements are seeking to challenge the dominant discourses surrounding austerity politics. The article suggests some reasons as to why traditional forms of resistance and organization—such as the mobilizations of the trade union movement—have largely been unsuccessful in challenging such narratives. The article concludes by considering the shift from trade unionism in the UK to post-crisis social movements, and where an anti-austerity movement more broadly might develop further in pursuit of defending the principles of social welfare, and, ultimately, the welfare state.

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Owen White and Elizabeth Heath

This introduction to the dossier “Wine, Economy, and Empire” surveys the place of economic history in the field of French Empire studies over the last twenty years. Drawing upon the concept of “economic life” as defined by William Sewell, the authors argue that a renewed focus on economic activity within the French Empire offers new opportunities to interrogate commonplace ideas about chronology, imperial forms, and structures of power. The article briefly examines some of the specific avenues of inquiry opened by a conception of economic life as socially “embedded,” while highlighting recent works that exemplify the possibilities of this approach for scholars of empire.

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Charlotte Faircloth, Carolyn Heitmeyer, Mari Korpela, Cheryl White and Paul Gilbert

Unsafe Motherhood: Mayan Maternal Morality and Subjectivity in Post-war Guatemala. Nicole S. Berry, 2010, New York and London: Berghahn Books (Fertility, Reproduction and Sexuality series), ISBN: 9781845457525, 250 pp., Hb. £50.00.

Bipolar Expeditions: Mania and Depression in American Culture. Emily Martin, 2009, Princeton: Princeton University Press, ISBN: 9780691141060, 370 pp., Pb. £16.95.

Caste, Occupation and Politics on the Ganges: Passages of Resistance. Assa Doron, 2008, Farnham: Ashgate (Anthropology and Cultural History in Asia and the Indo-Pacific) ISBN: 978-0-7546-7550-1, 198 pp., Hb. £55.

Rainforest Warriors: Human Rights on Trial. Richard Price, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011, ISBN: 9780812243000, 288 pp., Hb. £36.00.

Adventures in Aidland: The Anthropology of Professionals in International Development. David Mosse (ed.), 2011, New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books (Studies in Public and Applied Anthropology: Volume 6), ISBN: 978-0-85745-110-1, 238 pp., Hb. £55.00

Collateral Knowledge: Legal Reasoning in the Global Financial Markets. Annelise Riles, 2011, Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press (The Chicago Series in Law and Society), ISBN: 978-0-22671-933-7, 310 pp., Pb. £18.00

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Heike Bauer, Ann Heilmann, Emma Liggins, Angelica Michelis, Nickianne Moody and Chris White

Notes on contributors

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Bianca F.-C. Calabresi, Margaret W. Ferguson, Susan Fitzmaurice, Jennifer Wynne Hellwarth, David Scott Kastan, Mary Ellen Lamb, Elizabeth Rivlin, Eve Rachele Sanders and Janet Starner-White

Notes on contributors

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Obituary

John Albert White (1910-2001)

John J. Stephan

On 8 August 2001, John Albert White passed away in League City, Texas, six days before his ninety-first birthday and six decades after his debut as a historian of Russia in Asia.

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We are delighted to present a somewhat unorthodox line up in this

issue of German Politics and Society.

In our lead article, “A Nation in White: Germany’s Hygienic Consensus

and the Ambiguities of Modernist Architecture,” William

Rollins offers a fascinating analysis of modernist architecture in the

Weimar Republic through the lens of the bourgeois hygienic reform

movement. In particular, the article features an innovative discussion

of the centrality of the color white to this esthetic debate.

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Introduction

Locating Tween Girls

Melanie Kennedy and Natalie Coulter

We reflect on the media coverage of Amy “Dolly” Everett’s death by suicide to highlight the continued spectacularization of tweenhood as an idealized form of white feminine beauty tied to consumer culture, and one that shores up contradictory notions of the can-do/at-risk girl binary. We consider contemporary tweenhood’s continuities with the visibility and concerns of girlhood from the 1990s while questioning what a definition of tweenhood in the age of digital media and beyond the boundaries of whiteness, heteronormativity, able-bodiedness, and the Global North might look like. Calling for a discursive approach to understandings and conceptualizations of tweens, we introduce the eight articles in this special issue that range from media representations of the tween to lived experiences of actual tween girls.

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Claudia Mitchell and Jacqueline Reid-Walsh

The first “White House Research on Girls” Conference took place on 28 April 2014, in Washington, DC. At this event the Girls Research Coalition was formed, and the White House Council on Women and Girls also announced the establishment of the Girls Portal, a clearinghouse for research on girls, hosted by Re:Gender (formerly known as The National Council for Research on Women, Inc.), and meant to facilitate the sharing of existing research on girls, and to provide opportunities to explore new directions in research. This initiative is an important one for ensuring that the burgeoning research on girlhood reaches the many different audiences who need to have access to its findings. As the editors of GHS, we strongly endorse the establishment of the Girls Research Coalition and the Girls Portal.