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Joshua Grace

Mobility is often mentioned in African history, but rarely is it examined to its full analytical potential. This is unfortunate, in part because in the 1960s the first generation of African historians considered cultures of mobility a means of challenging stereotypes of African backwardness and simplicity. Jan Vansina, for example, used mobility to uncover “complexity” and “efficiency” in African political history—a stated goal of early Africanist historians working to debunk colonial stereotypes—and to challenge the structural-functionalist lens through which colonials and outsiders had understood African identities and social systems. In the following decades, mobility was critical to several aspects of African history—including slavery, women’s history, labor migration, and urbanization. Yet the makings of a recognizable field of African mobility have not emerged until recently.

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Report. The World Social Forum on Migrations 2012

Consolidating efforts towards an equitable society

Shirlita Africa Espinosa

From the back alleys of Madrid to the financial capital of Singapore, the migration of peoples either to flee persecution or to pursue a high-stakes transnational job is a global phenomenon. One may even say that the one permanent presence these days is a temporary migrant. The mobility of workers—and the mobility that characterizes the social world in which they live—has always had an economic interpretation manifesting in the antagonism of locals against labor migrants. The issue of migration and the attendant discourses of citizenship, social cohesion, population, resource sharing, employment, criminality, and cultural differences, to mention a few, are a common specter often raised for political maneuvering. To use the migrant subject as a scapegoat for sundry social and economic ills of the “host” society—a term that perpetuates the stereotype of the migrant as parasitical, thus, creating a fitting formula for those who hold power—is integral to the production of their subjectivity as an unwanted sector of a society. Nevertheless, the centrality of migration today in the creation of wealth in advanced economies is very much tied to the role that migrants play in the development strategies of their own nations. Through the billions of dollars transferred through remi􀄴 ances, migration is regarded as the vehicle of development for countries in the South. But if exporting cheap and temporary labor remains inexpensive as it continues to support the growth of industrialized countries both in the manufacturing and service sectors, including the domestic and affective spheres of the home, then how does migration specifically drive the development of sending countries?

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Somy Kim

ambitious in its reach. But the repeated references to stereotypes, humor, and satire as a “weapon of reason,” beg a viewer to question the ability of this satire to indeed critique established norms and institutionalized discrimination. When we laugh at Sam

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Florian Krobb and Dorit Müller

experiences to a communicable level and, concurrently, the “voice of the Other” might become obscured beneath genre conventions, stereotypes, and fantasies. 15 Conversely, narratives of travel often function as an occasion for the incorporation of the strange

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Mariana C. Françozo

predictable stereotypes (an unnecessarily loud jaguar roaring in the Brazilian jungle), these are represented in three small and rather informative galleries depicting the life encountered by migrants in Argentina, Brazil, and the United States. At the end of

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Introduction

Autonomous Driving and the Transformation of Car Cultures

Jutta Weber and Fabian Kröger

self-driving cars still function as prostheses of male identity? Could autonomous automobility even degender the driver? Or will hegemonic masculinity merely be reconfigured in future mobility cultures? As history teaches us, gender stereotypes are

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Women and development in Vietnam

Caught between social tradition and economic globalization

Khuat Thu Hong

, while at the same time they are required to be modest, reserved and obedient as insisted upon by traditional norms and stereotypes seen as the root core of the identity of “true Vietnamese women.” Does discrimination exist in Vietnam today? If so

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Johannes Görbert, Russ Pottle, Jeff Morrison, Pramod K. Nayar, Dirk Göttsche, Lacy Marschalk, Dorit Müller, Angela Fowler, Rebecca Mills, and Kevin Mitchell Mercer

political impact of colonial stereotypes and racist representations. Though it does not rewrite the story, the book reflects current research in the field, adds interesting new detail to existing knowledge, and explores hitherto neglected materials and

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Dhan Zunino Singh

bodies of three female passengers, matching the stereotype of the modern female worker (the Esthercita ). Although smart, their clothes are similar; even “the quality of the rouge in their lips” seems to be the same. After describing their hats, Amorín

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Undoing Traceable Beginnings

Citizenship and Belonging among Former Burundian Refugees in Tanzania

Patricia Daley, Ng’wanza Kamata, and Leiyo Singo

widespread intermarriage among ethnic groups, and the lack of public discourse on ethnicity, even though ethnic stereotypes pervade social and cultural life, but, in most cases, are articulated as utani (jokes). People’s areas of origin and names might