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The iAnimal Film Series

Activating Empathy Through Virtual Reality

Holly Cecil

on the abuse suffered by animals raised and killed for food. The practices that take place inside factory farms and slaughterhouses are kept hidden from the public. Animal Equality defends people's right to know what happens in modern farms and

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Affective Anachronisms, Fateful Becomings

Otaku Movement and the Joan of Arc Effect in Type-Moon's Transhistorical Anime Ecology

David John Boyd

, writing: “Closeness” means, in this context, both extending a product's range of play to make it as intimate for fans in as much of everyday life as possible (from toys to food, clothes, phones, and airplanes, for example) and capitalizing on the

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Josh Morrison, Sylvie Bissonnette, Karen J. Renner, and Walter S. Temple

Kate Mondloch, A Capsule Aesthetic: Feminist Materialisms in New Media Art (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2018), 151 pp. ISBN: 9781517900496 (paperback, $27) Alberto Brodesco and Federico Giordano, editors, Body Images in the Post-Cinematic Scenario: The Digitization of Bodies (Milan: Mimesis International, 2017). 195 pp., ISBN: 9788869771095 (paperback, $27.50) Cynthia J. Miller and A. Bowdoin Van Riper, editors, What’s Eating You? Food and Horror on Screen (New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017). 370pp., ISBN: 9781501322389 (hardback, $105); ISBN: 9781501343964 (paperback, $27.96); ISBN: 9781501322419 (ebook, $19.77) Kaya Davies Hayon, Sensuous Cinema: The Body in Contemporary Maghrebi Cinema (New York: Bloomsbury, 2018). 181pp., ISBN: 9781501335983 (hardback, $107.99)

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Brian Bergen-Aurand

Screen Bodies 3.2 engages with a wide variety of topics—fat studies, contemporary queer cinema, (pre)posterity, puzzle films, grief and truth in filmmaking, feminist materialism, digitized bodies, food and horror, and Maghrebi cinema. As well, the selection of articles in this issue represents studies of several media—tv programs, films, publicity stills, and photographs—from a number of locations around the globe—North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. What holds this general issue together, though, is a concern over expectation, assumption, and supposition: what we suppose screens and bodies do and what we suppose they do not do. As usual, with this journal, the focus of this consideration is doublehanded: screen as projection and screen as prohibition. The articles below explore the duality of screens and our responses to them. They engage screening expectation as showing, exposing, divulging, and, at the same time, as testing, partitioning, and withholding. To screen expectation is to reveal and conceal it, and, as these articles argue—each in their own way—this process is what we all engage in when we engage with screening.

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Kuang-Yi Ku

, scientists and commercial companies have been collaborating to synthesize cultured meat with an eye toward ameliorating the worldwide food shortage crisis. So it seems feasible to use these same technologies to produce “artificial tiger penis.” But the idea

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Introduction

Toward a Queer Sinofuturism

Ari Heinrich, Howard Chiang, and Ta-wei Chi

to LGBT-friendly education (including the right to legalized gay marriage, a model that extends, rather than revolutionizes, existing marriage structures), while, on the other, he was being threatened by (perceived) exposure to irradiated food from

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Ling Tang, Jun Zubillaga-Pow, Hans Rollmann, Amber Jamilla Musser, Shannon Scott, and Kristen Sollée

the diamonds around Francie’s (Grace Kelly) slender neck in To Catch a Thief (1955) . The trope of gluttony or conspicuous consumption is manifested through objects as well, specifically food. In The Farmer’s Wife (1928) , a table is overcrowded

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Peter Lurie, Antonio Sanna, Hansen Hsu, Ella Houston, and Kristof van Baarle

appetite. Indeed, “his self-styled identity as food connoisseur , fatso, and film director were inimitably intertwined” (6). Olsson considers such corporeal marketing of the franchise within the historical and cultural context of pre-and post-war America

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Introduction

Bodies, Sexualities, and Masculinities in the Time of Coronavirus

Jonathan A. Allan, Chris Haywood, and Frank G. Karioris

workers saw their incomes disappear overnight when the COVID-19 pandemic began to spread in Canada. Now many are in desperate situations in need of food, rent, basic necessities. Some are now homeless and without any income” ( Wright 2020 ). The Guardian

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Monstrous Masses

The Human Body as Raw Material

John Marmysz

physical state of affairs are explored. The creation crawls across the floor like a gigantic insect. With the connection of the victims’ various gastrointestinal tracts, food eaten by the first person in the chain passes as feces into the mouth of the