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Samira Alayan and Naseema Al-Khalidi

This article analyzes history, civics, and national education textbooks used between grades seven to twelve of the Palestinian and Jordanian school systems from a gender perspective. It focuses on the ways in which men and women are presented within the context of the prevalent culture, which portrays men as the more superior, capable, creative, productive, and therefore dominant, and women as weaker, inferior, dominated, and thus unable to play more than minor roles. As culture affects the perceptions, desires, and ambitions of both males and females, it becomes a key factor in changing the role of women in modern society, and is developed and transferred from one generation to another. This study also emphasizes the need to identify the approaches toward gender adopted by the curricula of Jordan and Palestine, as well as the nature of the language they use. The results from the sample used in this study indicate that although the stereotyping of men and women in both the public and the private sectors varies according to school grade and subject, there is an obvious bias in favor of men.

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Haifaa Majadly and Aharon Geva-Kleinberger

comparative analysis of the curricula in several countries. The countries selected (Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia) are spread over a large geographical territory and differ in their political, intellectual, and educational ideologies. 17

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Emily Stokes-Rees, Blaire M. Moskowitz, Moira Sun, and Jordan Wilson

exhibition is any indication, there are more revelations to be had as the Critical Edition team continues to probe Hunt and Boas's research and collecting and to encourage critical dialogue. Jordan Wilson, New York University Notes 1 See Isaiah

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Alexander Jordan

Thomas Carlyle (1795–1881) is commonly remembered as the archnemesis of economics, which he notoriously dubbed “the dismal science.” This article, however, suggests that Carlyle’s ideas in fact had a considerable influence among economists during the decades following his death. Indeed, an array of economists cited Carlyle in criticizing self-interest, laissez-faire, and materialism, in suggesting that economic science ought to accord greater importance to moral and ethical factors, and in urging the “Captains of Industry” and the state to exercise paternal guidance over the working classes. In short, Carlyle’s writings shaped these economists’ understanding, portrayal, and critique of the previous generation of so-called “old” economists, as well as their self-understanding as self-professed “new” economists.

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Jennifer A. Jordan

How do groups of people produce particular markers of the past in the urban landscape? The terrain of markers in a given neighborhood, city, or country can result from the top-down vision of a centralized elite-or the relatively diverse, even contradictory, layers of multiple eras and multiple interest groups and actors. In post 1989 Berlin, the memorial landscape is a heterogeneous collection of statues, plaques, and conceptual memorial projects relating to various eras in the city?s nearly eight centuries of existence. More widely known sites may be created in somewhat top-down ways, and be the responsibility of federal and state officials. But, much memorial work happens at the district level, and in the hands of an array of local activists. This local responsibility clearly indicates the active involvement of both easterners and westerners in local democratic and civic processes in general, and in activities that shape the memorial terrain in particular. Despite the inequality of unification and the extensive institutional transfer that happened in many sectors of the political and economic arenas, many eastern Berliners play active roles in the civic life in general and memorial culture in particular of their neighborhoods and districts. These local practices result from the civic participation (and arguably social integration) of a range of Berlin?s residents, in both the eastern and western halves of the city.

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Conceptualizing Compassion in Communication for Communication

Emotional Experience in Islamic Sermons (Bengali waʿẓ maḥfils)

Max Stille

narratives of the mother’s compassion described above open up different ways of relating to Allah’s mercy. A sermon from Jordan in the 1960s might be similar in equating Allah with a womb, 76 but that makes only marginal reference to the topic under

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Inaudito exemplo

The Abduction of Romsey’s Abbess

Linda D. Brown

Priory, St. John’s College, Cambridge, D46.27. 49 D46.27 writes the identification in full, while D46.58 abbreviates it. 50 Monasticon Anglicanum , 4:381. To my knowledge no subsequent scholarship has discussed this seal. 51 Erin L. Jordan, “The

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The Gallic Singularity

The Medieval and Early Modern Origins

Tracy Adams

same for fiefs. 15 In a study of female patrons in thirteenth-century Flanders and Hainault, Erin Jordan writes that in the absence of a male heir “fiefs on the continent would pass to the eldest daughter of the senior branch of the family,” and, she

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By Sentiment and By Status

Remembering and Forgetting Crémieux during the Franco-Algerian War

Jessica Hammerman

citizenship in 1940, and, for at least six months after Algeria’s liberation in 1943, Jews were indigenous in the eyes of the French government. As the JDC leader Charles Jordan observed in 1956, “The French showed, during the Vichy period, that the decree can

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Pious Women in a “Den of Scorpions”

The Piety and Patronage of the Eleventh-Century Countesses of Brittany

Amy Livingstone

siècle de pouvoir ducal Breton (936–1040),” in Actes du 103e Congres nationale des sociétiés savants (1979), 63–84. 4 Sharon Farmer, “‘Persuasive Voices’: Clerical Images of Medieval Women,” Speculum 61, no. 3 (1986): 517–543; Erin Jordan, Women