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Dan Flory

This article modifies philosopher Tamar Szabó Gendler's theory of imaginative resistance in order to make it applicable to film and analyze a distinctively adverse kind of resistant response to James Cameron's Avatar (2009). Gendler's theory, as she states it, seeks to explain resistance to literary stories in a straightforwardly cognitivist, but narrowly rationalistic fashion. This article introduces elements from recent work at the intersection of philosophy of film and the emotions to augment Gendler's theory so that it can be used to explain why some viewers hesitate or even refuse to imagine some cinematic fictional worlds. The method used is analytic philosophy of film. The analysis reveals that some viewers are cognitively impoverished with regard to imagining race in general: they will likely have extreme difficulty in centrally imagining racially "other" characters, which also bodes ill for their real-world prospects for moral engagements concerning race.

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Dan Flory

“All our phrasing—race relations, racial chasm, racial justice, racial profiling, white privilege, even white supremacy—serves to obscure that racism is a visceral experience.” — Ta-Nehisi Coates (2015) One of the more notorious sequences in D. W

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Jacob Breslow, Jonathan A. Allan, Gregory Wolfman, and Clifton Evers

Miriam J. Abelson. Men in Place: Trans Masculinity, Race, and Sexuality in America (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2020), 264 pp. ISBN: 9781517903510. Paperback, $25. Beginning with the deceptively simple premise that trans

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“The Dragon Can't Roar”

Analysis of British Expatriate Masculinity in Yusuf Dawood's One Life Too Many

Antony Mukasa Mate

their race. British women were objectified; men used them to affirm their virility. Their denigration of women contradicted Franz Fanon's postulation that the bodies of white women symbolize “white civilization and dignity” ( 1967: 63 ). The public

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Introduction

On a 1st Anniversary

Jonathan A. Allan, Chris Haywood, and Frank G. Karioris

making. During our first year, we published eight articles, a strong set of book reviews, and a tribute to a colleague who is deeply missed. The articles have examined issues related to aging, migration, race, and queerness—doing so in contexts from

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Beyond Binaries, Borders, and Boundaries

Mapping the City in John Rechy's City of Night

Eir-Anne Edgar

long been used in an attempt to explain that world. Note 1 In “States of Arousal/Fantasy Islands: Race, Sex, and Romance in the Global Economy of Desire,” Joane Nagel writes: “There is an ‘intimate substructure’ that underlies these realms and

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Ambivalent Sexualities in a Transnational Context

Romanian and Bulgarian Migrant Male Sex Workers in Berlin

Victor Trofimov

age, race, class, and gender, but also concerning what forms of sexuality are accepted within a particular national body ( Stambolis-Ruhstorfer 2017 ). In this regard, the difference between Western and Eastern Europe needs to be mentioned. While it is

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India Halstead

to walk with their legs joined by strips of magnets, recalling a childhood three-legged-race: the magnets repeatedly come apart, clacking together loudly in an otherwise silent room, their conjoined bodies hobbling across the floor. The effect of this

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Tru Leverette and Barbara Mennel

Zélie Asava. Mixed Race Cinemas: Multiracial Dynamics in America and France (New York Bloomsbury, 2017). 216 pp., ISBN: 1501312456 (paperback: $35.96) Reviewed by Tru Leverette On the cusp of the twenty-first century, Danzy Senna

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Before and After Ghostcatching

Animation, Primitivism, and the Choreography of Vitality

Heather Warren-Crow

arts, which embraced primitivism in an attempt to “exorcize the interiorized structures separating [European artists] from the authenticity of their own childhoods and of the childhood of their ‘race’” ( Leighten 2013: 60 ). 4 Primitivism in animation