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Henriette Löwisch

Alice Schwarzer’s name is synonymous with the second-wave women’s

movement in West Germany, and when she picks a fight, the odds are a

shouting match will follow. Admired by some, reviled by others, West Germany’s

best-known feminist has often used controversy to amplify the

activist journalism she has pursued since the late 1960s. She is opinionated,

combative, and unpredictable—attributes all reflected in her 1999 essay on

Leni Riefenstahl, which the interview below revisits. Her sympathetic portrayal

of the filmmaker met with criticism, which is certainly consistent with

the affinity toward ambivalence Schwarzer has demonstrated throughout

her career as an author, activist and talk show celebrity.

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Barbara Franchi and Natália da Silva Perez

The f-word used to be inappropriate for polite company, but today nobody seems afraid to say it, loud and proud. Hollywood stars and world-famous pop singers can openly claim to be feminists; it is now acceptable for mainstream celebrities to emulate that which more radical independent feminist artists have been doing for the past few decades. This gradual mainstreaming of feminism, facilitated in part by easier and wider access to communication technology, is reflected all over mass media. The last couple of years have also seen a number of high-profile female celebrities engaging in feminist political action. When Angelina Jolie and Emma Watson are UN ambassadors in projects that aim to promote the emancipation of women worldwide, when pop singer Beyoncé openly declares that “we have a way to go [to achieve equality] and it’s something that’s pushed aside and something that we have been conditioned to accept,” (Vena, 2013) their voices are heard by a wider audience, one that might not have been reached by the voices of activists and scholars who have for decades denounced the problems caused by gender discrimination.

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Walter Benjamin

The Consolation of History in a Paris Exile

Patrick H. Hutton

Walter Benjamin, a Jewish German literary critic of modest reputation during the interwar years, has become an intellectual celebrity in our times. In flight from Nazi Germany, he took refuge in Paris during the 1930s before dying in 1940 in a vain effort to escape to America. In this essay, I analyze his ideas as conceived in his Paris exile, with particular attention to his turn to the topics of memory and of history and of the relationship between them. I close with some thoughts on how his ideas about memory's redeeming power played into the humanist Marxism of the intellectuals of the 1960s and subsequently the preoccupation with memory in late twentieth-century scholarship.

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The Miserable, Mythical, Magical Marmiton

Representing Culinary Apprenticeship in Early Third Republic France

Michael D. Garval

Revealing paradoxes abounded in early Third Republic French representations of the marmiton, or culinary apprentice. Investigative reportage and reformist discourse exposed apprentices’ miserable existence while still depicting these young fellows as playful and carefree. Conversely, popular marmiton mythology, particularly in children’s literature, idealized culinary apprenticeship, amid glimpses of harsh living and working conditions, while also highlighting admittedly rare opportunities for ambitious apprentices to achieve substantial public success. Max Jacob’s children’s book Histoire du Roi Kaboul Ier et du Marmiton Gauwain provides an emblematic example with its parodic fairy-tale rendering of celebrity chef Auguste Escoffier’s extraordinary triumphs. Ultimately, while enchanting, the rosy popular vision of the magical marmiton obfuscated exploitative child labor practices underpinning the whole culinary enterprise in this supposed golden age of French gastronomy.

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Elliot Neaman

The epigraph seems to border on hyperbole: were the debates in the

fall of 2001 really “exclusively” subsumed by domestic politics? But

Bassam Tibi, one of the hundreds of experts who made the rounds

on the endless talk shows and conferences in Germany, may be on to

something. In a recent book about how the public intellectuals, religious

leaders, and celebrities reacted to the terror attacks of September

11th, Der Spiegel essayist Hendryk Broder made a similar point as

he aimed his bittersweet satirical wit at the navel-gazing, self-righteousness,

and hypocrisy of Germany’s public intellectuals.2 Broder’s

book is a self-conscious example of that timeless German genre, the

Streitschrift, an erudite polemic in the service of both noble edification

and less high-minded settling of scores with one’s intellectual

opponents. Although exaggerated, one-sided, and terribly funny,

Broder’s analysis of the German public discourse of the fall of 2001

does contain some serious arguments that anyone interested in the

European perception of America cannot ignore. In this essay, I will

sketch the contours of that reaction by focusing first on the kinds of

issues that preoccupied German intellectuals in the wake of the

attacks of September 11th; second, I will contrast that reaction to how ordinary Germans and government officials perceived those

events; third, I will explore the role that anti-Americanism played in

the intellectual debates of fall 2001; and finally, I will reflect on the

significance of September 11th for German society in general.

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Making Sense of the Human-Nature Relationship

A Reception Study of the “Nature Is Speaking” Campaign on YouTube

Ulrika Olausson

media studies: in tourist information, where the “othering” of nature has been a pronounced feature ( Uggla and Olausson 2013 ); in celebrity conservation campaigns, where humans are attributed the role as the “other” in relation to nature ( Olausson and

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Disruptive Technology

Social Media from Modiano to Zola and Proust

Elizabeth Emery

feature of American newspapers: photo spreads of celebrities in the private rooms of their houses. Instead of republishing well-known photographs of the semi-public space of writers’ studies, such as those in Dornac’s Nos Contemporains chez eux series

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Licht aus–Spot an

How Schlager (ZDF 1969–1984) Beat Disco (ZDF 1971–1982)

Sunka Simon

-centric top ten music and celebrity culture, long before the Idol franchise made this popular. Audience members in the studio and at home were asked to send in postcards with their top song choice of the evening’s performances. The winner would get a return

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Nicolas Sembel

) before Durkheim (the celebrity)’ – long-awaited, because the original idea dates from 2008 and a conference on the 150th anniversary of Durkheim’s birth. It was an opportunity, as Marcel Fournier and Charles Kraemer point out in their introduction, for a

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Digitally Dismantling Asian Authoritarianism

Activist Reflections from the #MilkTeaAlliance

Adam K. Dedman and Autumn Lai

( Cheung, Marchetti, and Ching-Mei Esther Yau 2018 ) have reallocated resources to produce Mandarin songs and coproductions for the PRC market; the political ramifications of Hong Kong celebrities’ financial reliance on China became very clear during the