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Jean-Christophe Marcel

Maurice Halbwachs, Les Classes Sociales, édition critique de Gilles Montigny, préface de Christian Baudelot, Paris : Presses Universitaires de France, 2008, pp. 300.

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Jean-Paul Sartre and Ronald Aronson

In early 1945, with the war not yet over, Sartre travelled to the United States for the first time. He travelled with a group of correspondents who were invited in order to influence French public opinion favourably towards the United States.1 Sartre was sent by his friend Albert Camus to report back to Combat, the leading newspaper of the independent left. Once invited, he arranged also to report back to the conservative newspaper, Le Figaro. Simone de Beauvoir reports that learning of Camus’ invitation in late 1944 was one of the most exciting moments of Sartre’s life.

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Ian Mahoney and Tony Kearon

impact on the local economy and their lives as a whole. In doing so, we seek to offer a counterpoint to dominant narratives that suggest that working-class Brexit voters are a homogenous, uneducated, lazy, and easily led mass who uncritically consumed and

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Concerning Durkheim's 1899 Lecture ‘On Penal Sanctions’

Introduction, Translation Notes, and Comments

Ronjon Paul Datta and François Pizarro Noël

Durkheim's handwritten lecture notes prepared by Pizarro Noël (this issue). Durkheim routinely wrote his lectures in a rush at the last minute, just prior to class. As he wrote in a letter to Mauss in January 1900, ‘Or cette année, depuis décembre, je

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The Social Consequences of Brexit for the UK and Europe

Euroscepticism, Populism, Nationalism, and Societal Division

Steve Corbett

.” This led Stephen George (1998) to famously describe the UK as an “awkward partner” with the rest of Europe. As a result, a pragmatic and skeptical position about grand projects has been the British political class’s approach to the EU, with a narrow

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From In-Itself to Practico-Inert

Freedom, Subjectivity and Progress

Kimberly S. Engels

’ which mediates the possibilities for our projects. This ontological realm includes human-made objects, language, passively received ideas, social objects or institutions, and class being. Showing the transition from in-itself in BN to practico-inert in

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Jan Berting

We never see our society as it really is, but always as it appears through our collective representations. Different groups and classes perceive social reality through different social lenses—collective representations—and give different

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Kathleen Wider

Phyllis Sutton Morris, co-founder of the Sartre Society of North America and member of its executive committee for several years, died on May 31, 1997 from complications due to cancer. Phyllis received her undergraduate degree in philosophy from the University of California at Berkeley and her doctorate from the University of Michigan. She taught for several years at Kirkland College in New York and was, at various times in more recent years, on the faculty at LeMoyne College, Oberlin College, and the University of Michigan. She was a devoted teacher who dedicated a great deal of time and energy to preparing her classes and to meeting with students.

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Margaret A. Majumdar

Writing in 1966, Roger Garaudy saw Althusser and Sartre occupying the two poles of contemporary French Marxist thought.1 While no-one would deny their fundamental difference in approach, the fact remains that both were participants in the same project – the modernisation of Marxism in the light of theoretical and political problems which had affected its development, with the aim of achieving an autonomous space for the intellectual to engage with Marxist theory and the practice of the working-class struggle. Both were primarily intellectuals; both were capable of intransigence

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David Drake

When considering Sartre’s and Camus’ positions on the Algerian War of Independence, it is useful to begin by briefly locating both men in relation to colonialism in general and Algeria in particular. The first point, an obvious one, but one which needs to be made, is that while Camus, the child of Belcourt, had first-hand knowledge of life in working-class Algiers, and as a journalist of the misery of Kabylia in the late 1930s, Sartre, the Parisian intellectual par excellence, had almost no direct knowledge of the country. I say almost no direct knowledge because he and de Beauvoir did pass through southern Algeria en route to French West Africa in 1950 but apparently paid scant attention to the political situation in that country.