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How Do Students Rate Textbooks?

A Review of Research and Ongoing Challenges for Textbook Research and Textbook Production

Petr Knecht and Veronika Najvarová

This article argues in favor of including students in textbook research. As teachers decide which textbooks to use in their classrooms, they are the ones who influence textbook development. The article presents a research review of students' evaluations of textbooks, demonstrating that inviting students into the debate may result in interesting stimuli for improving textbooks. The article also discusses suggestions based on student feedback.

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Student Mobility and Internationalisation

Rationales, Rhetoric and 'Institutional Isomorphism'

Vered Amit

Drawing on interviews with Canadian and Australian officials, this article examines the frame of student mobility within the broad discourse of internationalisation. Difficulties in definition and admitted shortfalls in achieving progress even on the more easily articulated benchmarks of student mobility, do not seem to staunch the enthusiasm of a variety of officials for the idea of internationalisation. This article will examine some of the contradictions framing these institutional discourses of internationalisation. These include the gaps between institutional claims and their substantiation, between lauding the internationalism inculcated by student mobility programmes and the more mixed motivations or engagements of student clients, and between claims for the entrepreneurial potential of internationalisation as against the uncertainty of its outcomes. I argue that a long-standing Western view of travel as a vehicle for self-cultivation and transformation combined with competitive efforts to keep up with perceived trends in the fields of post-secondary education are producing a momentum that is elusive even as it threatens to bulldoze its way across important institutional practices and procedures.

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Anna-Leena Toivanen

In the field of postcolonial literary studies, representations of concrete forms of mobility have not received the critical attention they deserve. This is partly due to the field’s reductive understanding of “mobility” as a synonym for migration. In order to enhance dialogue between postcolonial literary studies and mobilities research, this article focuses on representations of aeromobility in the context of Afroeuropean student mobilities in a set of Francophone African novels from the 1980s to the 2010s. My reading of scenes of aeromobility in the text corpus draws attention to the anxious aspects of the air travel of unaccustomed travelers and African newcomers traveling to the former colonial center, and explores the formal functions of representations of aeromobility in terms of narrative structures and tropes.

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Invisible labour

Do we need to reoccupy student engagement policy?

Sarah Hayes

The Zepke-Trowler debate Zepke draws attention to literature that suggests that student engagement is a ‘hot topic’ and a ‘buzz phrase’ in higher education (2014: 697) because it focuses on those aspects of student success and performativity

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Alienating students

Marxist theory in action

Megan Thiele, Yung-Yi Diana Pan, and Devin Molina

broadly but also to understand the current plight of workers in contemporary society. Within the postsecondary classroom many students are preparing themselves for a full-time commitment to the labour market. For this new generation of labourers

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Higher education in the paradigm of speed

Student perspectives on the risks of fast-track degree completion

Laura Louise Sarauw and Simon Ryberg Madsen

image of the unforeseen and yet underexposed implications of the recent Danish Study Progress Reform (2014) and the economic incentives that were expected to provide a ‘tailwind’ for the process of completing university students’ degrees. According to

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Geoff Payne

For many undergraduates, direct practical experience of ‘student engagement’ in higher education, has been, and continues to be, limited. Nielsen (2015: 3–4 ) has drawn attention to the evolution of ideas about engagement from first an

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Barbara Robertson and Mark J. Flowers

Use of online courses in bricks-and-mortar colleges and universities has increased substantially, as have the number of traditional and non-traditional students seeking to take courses online. 1 The course materials online students are expected

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The Contemporary Turn

Debate, Curricula, and Swedish Students' History

Thomas Nygren

In 2010, a proposal for a new history syllabus was criticized in the Swedish media for emphasizing contemporary history at the expense of ancient history. This study shows how contemporary history has increasingly been the focus of the guidelines developed by UNESCO and the Council of Europe, the national curricula, and students' work since the 1950s, while graduating students had generally rather chosen to focus on the early modern era up until the 1930s. Although history and civics were given status as separate school subjects in 1961, students' work in history continued to focus on contemporary subject matter. This study shows that the dominance of contemporary history in students' history is by no means a new phenomenon.

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Jacqui Close

Much has been written about ‘student engagement’, what it means, how it is practiced and whether it provides the key to unlocking student potential ( Kuh et al. 2006 ) and improving student ‘success’ ( Bryson 2014 ). These are important