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‘Master, Slave and Merciless Struggle’

Sin and Lovelessness in Sartre's Saint Genet

Kate Kirkpatrick

: Pantheon, 1984). 2 See Kate Kirkpatrick, ‘Sartre: An Augustinian Atheist’‚ Sartre Studies International 21, no. 1 (2015): 1–20; Kate Kirkpatrick, Sartre on Sin: Between Being and Nothingness (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017). 3 Iris Murdoch

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Edited by Ârash Aminian Tabrizi, Kate Kirkpatrick, and Marieke Mueller

possibilities for thinking with Sartre – today. Ârash Aminian Tabrizi Kate Kirkpatrick Marieke Mueller

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Kate Kirkpatrick

This article attempts to redress the neglect of Sartre's relationship to Augustine, putting forward a reading of the early Sartre as an atheist who appropriated concepts from Augustinian theology. In particular, it is argued, Sartre owes a debt to the Augustinian doctrine of original sin. Sartre's portrait of human reality in Being and Nothingness is bleak: consciousness is lack; self-knowledge is impossible; and to turn to the human other is to face the imprisonment of an objectifying gaze. But this has recognizable antecedents in Augustine's account of the condition of human fallenness. The article, therefore, (a) demonstrates the significant similarities between Sartre's ontology of human freedom and Augustine's ontology of human sin; and (b) asks whether Sartre's project – as defined in Existentialism Is a Humanism – 'to draw the full conclusions from a consistently atheistic position' – results in a vision of the world without God, but not without sin. It is proposed that this opens the possibility for a previously unexplored theological reading of Sartre's early work.

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Chiara Collamati

Translator : Marieke Mueller and Kate Kirkpatrick

Abstract

Through an analysis of the category of alienation in the Critique of Dialectical Reason, this article aims to shed light on the way in which Sartre attempts to think through alienation both with Marx and going beyond Marx. Sartre does not reduce alienation either to an ontological dimension of praxis or to the exclusively socio-economic determination of the capitalist mode of production. In order to grasp better the theoretical stakes of Sartre’s position, André Gorz’s analyses of the link between labour and alienation is discussed. The path via Gorz (who always insisted on his philosophical indebtedness to Sartre) is useful in order to ascertain whether it is justified to adopt the Sartrean dialectic of praxis and alienation as the basis of a critique of labour in the present configuration of the capitalist system. These questions will be taken as a starting point for an ethical and political examination of the category of need, as it is problematized by Sartre in the Critique and above all in the manuscript of “Les Racines de l’éthique” (1964).

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Kyle Michael James Shuttleworth and Nik Farrell Fox

George Pattison and Kate Kirkpatrick, The Mystical Sources of Existentialist Thought: Being, Nothingness, Love (New York: Routledge, 2019) 228 pp., ISBN-13: 978-1138092372 (hardback) It has been widely acknowledged by early commentators on

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Liesbeth Schoonheim

Kate Kirkpatrick, Becoming Beauvoir: A Life (London: Bloomsbury, 2019), xiv +476 pp. ISBN: 9781–350–04717–4 Simone de Beauvoir, Diary of a Philosophy Student: Volume 2, 1928–29 . The Beauvoir Series. Edited by Barbara Klaw, Sylvie Le Bon

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John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

ontologically and congenitally disposed to bad faith’. This issue also contains three reviews of a more usual sort. Liesbeth Schoonheim, reviewing both Kate Kirkpatrick's Becoming Beauvoir: A Life and Simone de Beauvoir's Diary of a Philosophy Student

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John H. Gillespie, Marcos Norris, and Nik Farrell Fox

Kate Kirkpatrick, Sartre and Theology (London: Bloomsbury, 2017), xi + 226 pp., ISBN 978-0-567-66449-5 (paperback). At the start of this excellent study Kate Kirkpatrick rightly emphasises how under-researched the area of Sartre, God and Theology

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John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

rejecting these traditional ideas of the image in this early piece are very different from those he offers later, and the methodology he employs here is decidedly not phenomenological. Kate Kirkpatrick's ‘“Master, Slave, and Merciless Struggle”: Sin and

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De Beauvoir, Existentialism and Marx

A Dialectic on Freedom

Angela Shepherd

history that becomes his’. 9 Kate Fullbrook and Edward Fullbrook 10 insist on this perspective. What is important for this article, however, is that arguments are now beginning to emerge that recognise de Beauvoir as differing significantly from Sartre