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Heidi Hakkarainen

In the German history of concepts, the era between 1760 and 1840 has been of special interest. The historian Reinhart Koselleck famously called this period a Sattelzeit , a time when not only cultural formations and social structures but also

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Healing through Heritage?

The Repatriation of Human Remains from European Collections as Potential Sites of Reconciliation

Carsten Wergin

This contribution explores the potential of restitution projects as places of transcultural encounter and healing. It draws on ethnographic material recorded during repatriation ceremonies for human remains that were handed back by German

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Shylock and the Nazis

Continuation or Reinvention?

Alessandra Bassey

Eighty-five years ago, in 1933, Dr Walter Stang, a theatre critic and member of the National Socialist German Workers Party, claimed that ‘National socialism … would ensure the development of completely new forms in the German Theatre’. 1

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Pegida in Parliament?

Explaining the Failure of Pegida in Austria

Farid Hafez

(Pegida, its German acronym) and its role in Austria in early January 2015. 1 At the time Pegida Austria had announced its first protest in the capital city of Vienna. Only 300 people, however, attended the first public rally and soon Pegida Austria

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Marco Sonnberger and Michael Ruddat

The transition to renewable energy in Germany is an enormous task. It requires long-term and intensive communication as well as the cooperation of all societal groups and systems (politics, economy, science, civil society, and citizens). The

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Osnat Roth-Cohen and Yehiel Limor

Surprisingly, scant research has focused on the development of Israeli society stemming from German-Jewish immigration (the ‘Fifth’ or ‘German’ Aliyah). This study offers a historical description of the Fifth Aliyah by analyzing its contribution to

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Hyeong-ki Kwon

The German model of political economy that had been an enviable

alternative to the liberal market until the late 1980s in the literature of

political economy was under serious structural crisis throughout the

1990s, causing serious doubts about its viability. Many neoliberals

and industrial experts in Germany began to doubt whether Germany

was an attractive place for business activity, initiating the Standort

Deutschland debate. Even German Chancellor Gerhard Schröder conceded

“the end of German model.”1 Many political economists and

journalists expected and recommended imitating the American

model of a liberal market. Prominent German newspapers and magazines

such as the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Der Spiegel, and Die

Woche ran articles titled “The Discovery of America” and “Jobwunder

in Amerika.” Wolfgang Streeck, one of the main proponents of the

German model, expected the convergence of the German economy

toward an American-led liberal market economy under globalization

because of “a secular exhaustion of the German model.” Streeck

believed that the postwar German model was based on the politics

between labor and capital within a national boundary, but globalization

represents a fluidity of financial and labor markets that extricates

whatever coordination has been nationally accomplished.

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Explaining Germany's Electoral Geography

Evidence from the Eastern States

Steven Wuhs and Eric McLaughlin

Partisan attachments and voting behavior in Germany today are more volatile than in the past. This article tests the enduring influence of social cleavages on voting relative to two other factors that account for party performance: path dependent forces and spatial dependence. Drawing on original data from the eastern German states, we explain support for Germany’s main parties in the 2017 federal election. We find relatively weak evidence for continued influence of social divisions for the major parties, but that support for the radical right Alternative for Germany (AfD) did reflect underlying cleavage structures. Additionally, we identify reliable effects of the historical immigrant population on contemporary voting. We also see weak evidence of lock-in political effects associated with German reunification, limited only to the CDU. Most interestingly, we observe powerful and robust effects of spatial dependence for three of the four parties we examine. We conclude that the effects presented here should signal to scholars of parties and electoral politics the need to incorporate history and geography into their analytical frameworks alongside more traditional approaches, since eastern Germany may in fact be less spatialized than western Germany or other country cases because of the homogenizing efforts of the SED regime.

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Florian Helfer

Introduction For a long time, colonial memory used to be at the margins of the German culture of remembrance ( Erinnerungskultur ). This began to change with Namibian independence in 1990 and the ensuing diplomatic relations between Namibia

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The Alternative for Germany from Breakthrough toward Consolidation?

A Comparative Perspective on Its Organizational Development

E. Gene Frankland

and left extremists, institutional/legal obstacles to new parties, and social market-based prosperity. West German politics was structured by competition between two Volksparteien —the center-right Christian Democratic Union/Christian Social Union