Search Results

You are looking at 91 - 100 of 413 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Marianna Muravyeva

Olga Khazbulatova and Natalia Gafizova. Zhenskoe Dvizhenie v Rossiji (Vtoraja Polovina XIX—Nachalo XX veka) (The women’s movement in Russia [second half of the nineteenth, early twentieth century]), Ivanovo: Izdatel’stvo Ivanovo, 2003, 256 pp. ISBN 5-85229-147-1

Tatiana Mel’nikova. Zhenskoe Dvizhenie v Rossiji: Traditsiji i Innovatsiji (The women’s movement in Russia: Traditions and innovations), Moskva: Mysl’, 2000, 180 pp. ISBN 5-244-00968-0

Natalia Pushkareva. Russkaja Zhenschina: Istorija i Sovremennost’. Dva veka Izuchenija ‘Zhenskoj Temy‘ Russkoj i Zarubezhnoj Naukoj. 1800–2000. Materialy k Bibliografii (The Russian woman: history and present: Two centuries of studying ‘women’s theme’ by Russian and Western science. 1800–2000. With bibliography), Moskva: Nauchno- Izdatel’skij Tsentr ‘Ladomir’, 2002, 526 pp. ISBN 5-86218-397-3

Irina Yukina. Istorija Zhenschin v Rossiji. Zhenskoe Dvizhenie i Feminism v 1850–1920-e gg. Materialy k Bibliografiji (History of women in Russia: The women’s movement and feminism, 1850–1920. With bibliography), St. Petersburg: Aleteija, 2003, 234 pp. ISBN 5-89329-615-X

Free access

Introduction

Cinemas of Boyhood, Part I

Timothy Shary

These are ripe times to study boyhood in cinema. Even though male characters have undoubtedly dominated cinema roles from the start, boys’ stories have not been consistently produced or appreciated. Since the publication of Where the Boys Are: Cinemas of Masculinity and Youth, a collection edited by Murray Pomerance and Frances Gateward in 2005, there has been increasing academic interest in boyhood representation through movies, as demonstrated by the articles collected here. This interest follows the expansive concerns of pop psychology texts at the turn of the century that took up the political and emotional consequences of boys’ behavior, such as Real Boys: Rescuing Our Sons from the Myths of Boyhood by William Pollack (1999), Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys by Dan Kindlon and Michael Thompson (2000), and The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism is Harming Our Young Men by Christina Hoff Sommers (2001).As is evident in their titles, this research joined the chorus of a prevailing masculinity in crisis theme that has permeated gender studies in recent years: boys have been troubled by the pressures of patriarchy, the demands of feminism, and the culture of capitalism, and thus are in need of rescue and protection from these influences.

Restricted access

For Women's Rights, Church, and Fatherland

The Lithuanian Catholic Women's Organisation, 1908-1940

Indrė Karčiauskaitė

This article examines the history of the Lietuviu Katalikiu Moteru Draugija (LKMD, Lithuanian Catholic Women's Organisation) from its foundation in 1908 to its disbandment under Soviet occupation in 1940. Special attention is paid to the LKMD's changing relationship with the Catholic clergy and Lithuanian nationalism. Exploring which type of feminism the LKMD represented, the article focuses on attitudes of the LKMD leadership towards women's rights, participation in society, and paid employment. The beginning of the 1920s is shown to have been a turning point. At that time many educated women became active in order to enshrine women's rights in the statutes of the newly independent Lithuanian State. Several of them joined the LKMD, subsequently succeeding in reducing the clergy's influence on the organisation's central board. The LKMD, it turns out, was a good example of a women's organisation espousing relational feminism (Karen Offen's term), insisting on women's participation in society as being distinct from men's, particularly in relation to women's role as mothers, while taking a stand for equality between men and women, especially with respect to judicial issues.

Free access

Andrew J. Ball

I am pleased to begin the final issue of the year with a very special announcement. Screen Bodies is modifying its editorial direction and the kind of work it will feature. Many of our readers will already have a sense of these changes, made evident by the new Aims and Scope section we made available online earlier this summer, and by the journal’s new subtitle, The Journal of Embodiment, Media Arts, and Technology. As these indicate, the foundational commitments of the journal remain unchanged; however, moving forward will we intensify our focus on new media art, technology studies, and the interface of the sciences and the humanities. We will continue to examine the cultural, aesthetic, ethical, and political dimensions of emerging technologies, but with a renewed attention to such areas as intermediality, human–machine interface, virtual and augmented reality, artificial intelligence, generative art, smart environments, immersive and interactive installations, machine learning, biotechnology, computer science, digital culture, and digital humanities. The journal will continue to prioritize matters of the body and screen media, both in terms of representation and engagement, but will emphasize research that critically reexamines those very concepts, as, for example, in the case of object-oriented feminism’s nonanthropocentric approach, which asks us to rethink what we mean by bodies and embodiment.

Restricted access

The “power of silence”

Spirituality and women's agency beyond the Catholic Church in Poland

Agnieszka Kościańska

This article looks at various models of women's agency in Poland in the context of religion. Based on fieldwork among members of two feminized religious milieus—a new religious movement the Brahma Kumaris and an informal Catholic fundamentalist group—this article discusses the role of silence in ritual and everyday life as a form of agency. From the perspective of feminist discourse, particularly Western liberal feminism, silence is often interpreted as a lack of power. Drawing on informants' experiences, under Polish gender regimes, particularly as they relate to the organization of public and private spheres, silence is shown to be a fundamental component of agency. The analysis of silence displays the complexity of religious issues in Poland and serves as a critique of assumptions about religious homogeneity and the pervasiveness of religious authority in Poland.

Restricted access

Sarah Elise Wiliarty, The CDU and the Politics of Gender in Germany: Bringing Women to the Party

Reviewed by Louise K. Davidson-Schmich

Silja Häusermann, The Politics of Welfare State Reform in Continental Europe: Modernization in Hard Times

Reviewed by Aaron P. Boesenecker

Martin Klimke, The Other Alliance: Student Protest in West Germany and the United States in the Global Sixties

Reviewed by Chris Lore

Katja M.Guenther, Making their Place: Feminism after Socialism in Eastern Germany

Reviewed by Ingrid Miethe

Brian M. Puaca, Learning Democracy: Education Reform in West Germany, 1945-1965

Reviewed by Miriam Intrator

Hans Kundnani, Utopia or Auschwitz—Germany’s 1968 Generation and the Holocaust

Reviewed by Joyce Marie Mushaben

Ruth H. Sanders, German: Biography of a Language

Reviewed by Kurt R. Jankowsky

Andrew Wright Hurley, The Return of Jazz: Joachim-Ernst Berendt and West German Cultural Exchange

Reviewed by Jonathan Wipplinger

Theo Sarrazin, Deutschland schafft sich ab: Wie wir unser Land aufs Spiel setzen

Reviewed by Randall Hansen

Restricted access

Myra Marx Ferree, Varieties of Feminism: German Gender Politics in Global Perspective (Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2012)

Reviewed by Angelika von Wahl

K. Michael Prince, War and German Memory: Excavating the Significance of the Second World War in German Cultural Consciousness (Lanham: Lexington Books, 2009)

Reviewed by Richard Boffey

Shulamit Volkov, Walther Rathenau. Weimar’s Fallen Statesman (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2012)

Reviewed by Sabine von Mering

Quinn Slobodian, Foreign Front: Third World Politics in Sixties West Germany (Durham: Duke University Press, 2012)

Reviewed by Anna von der Goltz

Mary Fulbrook, A Small Town Near Auschwitz: Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012)

Reviewed by Richard Boffey

Lily Gardner Feldman, Germany’s Foreign Policy of Reconciliation: From Enmity to Amity (Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2012)

Reviewed by Eric Langenbacher

Restricted access

Frederika Eilers

Engaging a cross-disciplinary approach, this comparative analysis shows how two disparate icons, Barbie and Modulor, are similar. The former is an often criticized symbol of girl culture, beauty, and consumerism. The latter is a drawing of a man that summarizes the dimensional system of Le Corbusier, one of the world's most influential architects, and that subsequently became a symbol of modern architecture. Divided into three parts—idealized bodies, their spaces, and how typical users are excluded—this nuanced interpretation explores the intersections of architecture, feminism, embodiment, and ableism. I show how these two bodies—Barbie and Modulor—inspire homes that emphasize the vertical: the buildings exclude typical users. For instance, Barbie's friend Becky, who is in a wheelchair, does not fit into Barbie's skinny world and Modulor's needs are dissimilar to those of mothers and children. Putting these artifacts into conversation reinvigorates the subjects and provides a contextual framework in which to consider Barbie's house as architecture.

Restricted access

D'une laïcité à l'autre

les débats sur le voile et la mémoire de la loi Ferry

Mayyada Kheir

Throughout the 2004 headscarf affair, both partisans and opponents of the law have claimed to stand for laïcité, this founding value of the Third Republic. While there were of course many other issues at stake—including, but not limited to, feminism, postcolonialism, the banlieues problem—it is impossible to understand the scope and the positions of this debate without taking into account the importance of laïciteacute; in French history. This paper presents an analysis of one of the founding debates on French laïcité, the one leading to the Ferry law of 1882 on non-confessional education in public primary schools. By examining more closely the birth of the école laïque, we hope to offer a new perspective on the contemporary issues.

Restricted access

Women and Carnival Space

Gender and Carnival in a North Aegean Island Community

Regina Zervou

This article focuses on gender relations through the performance of carnival rites in a North Aegean island rural community. Based on qualitative research, it approaches the women’s use of public space during carnival and the changes under the influence of women’s emancipation since the 1970s. The percentage of women, especially young girls, participating in carnival rites has risen dramatically over the last decade. However, not all carnival public spaces are equally open to women. The article examines the way women try to impose their presence on the strictly male universe of the carnival space and especially the marketplace, the traditional and timeless core of the carnival rites, where only men can pronounce the obscene carnival language, fruit of the kafeneion male discourse and the reactions of the male community to the novelties brought by feminism into the village.