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Home Away from Home

Ethnography of an EU Erasmus+ Project

Terry Lamb and Danila Mayer

five organisations: Tumult in Belgium, the World of NGOs in Austria, the Centre for Peace in Croatia, forumZFD in Germany and the University of Westminster in the United Kingdom. Running from 2017 to 2019, the project consisted of thorough desk research

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Familial Intimacy and the ‘Thing’ between Us

Cuddle Curtains and Desires for Detached Relationality in Germany, Austria and Switzerland

Andreas Streinzer, Almut Poppinga, Carolin Zieringer, Anna Wanka, and Georg Marx

video was Antony Cauvin, the creator of what the media termed ‘the cuddle curtain’, and his creation and hug was shared hundreds of thousands of times ( Cauvin 2020 ). Our research team members observed in Austria, Germany and Switzerland how the display

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Introduction

Anthropological Approaches to the Study of Children in the Middle East

Erika Friedl and Abderrahmane Moussaoui

successful youth organisation of Middle East Muslim immigrants in Austria to show how dual identity can work in a host society that had learned from generations of dealing with immigrants how to avoid what in other Western societies is a social and political

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‘Fate Leads the Willing, and Drags the Unwilling’

Eric Werner, Wissenschaft des Judenthums, and the Postwar Reconstruction of Jewish Music Study

Judah M. Cohen

. These works were published in different Jewish newspapers and periodicals, i.e., the B'nai-Brith paper for Austria in the ‘Tribune Juive’ (Strassburg) in the ‘Jüdische Rundschau’ (Berlin) and in the Vienna, Breslau, and Saarbrücken Jewish Community Paper

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Learning to Dwell with Micro-Organisms

Corporeality, Relationality, Temporality

Lydia Maria Arantes

. Having bought our first (rye) sourdough starter from a bakery that quickly realised home-baking was growing exponentially a couple of weeks into corona lockdown in Austria, now there was this thing in our household demanding attention and the creation of

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On separating memory from historical science

A critique and three Austrian cases

Hermann Rebel

To illustrate its critique of a professional-academic practice of separating 'scientific history' from 'popular memory' perceptions, this article examines three examples from current Austrian historiography and memorial constructions. The cases under consideration, all relevant to Austrian historians' representation of the national Holocaust experience, focus firstly, on relationships between present historical perceptions of the Austrian 'foreign police', particularly of the latter's so-called Schubsystem, and their fatal popular memory enactments, both 'then' and 'now'; secondly, on historical-scientific representations of Eastern European family formations as a, possibly ingenuous, popular memory repetition of similar historical-analytical perceptions by Nazi social science; and thirdly, on the selective appearance of the forced labor and death camp Mauthausen in official histories of the Austrian Nazi experience as possible collaborations with the camp's ceremonial restructuring into a ritual object for popular memory engineering that in effect destroys the material evidence of the crime being commemorated.

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The Alternative for Germany from Breakthrough toward Consolidation?

A Comparative Perspective on Its Organizational Development

E. Gene Frankland

institutionalization of the AfD so far. To what extent has it followed the path of “mature” populist radical-right parties, such as the Austrian Freedom Party (FPӦ) and the Italian Northern League ( ln )? Finally, what are prospective relationships between the AfD and

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A Gloomy Carnival of Freedom

Sex, Gender, and Emotions among Polish Displaced Person in the Aftermath of World War II

Katarzyna Nowak

squares and streets across western Germany and Austria to celebrate the freedom granted them by Allied soldiers. Liberation, however, did not bring the peace Displaced Persons (DPs) had imagined. The festival of freedom was quickly followed by the

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A Holy War and Revenge for Kishinev

Austrian Rabbis Justify the First World War

Marsha L. Rozenblit

During the First World War Austrian rabbis played a major role in constructing a meaningful justification for the war that enabled both soldiers and those on the home front to endure the bloody conflict. Because Austria's main enemy in the first two years of the war was Russia, the 'evil empire' that persecuted its Jews, Austrian Jews, and rabbis in particular, saw the war as a just and holy war to liberate the Jews of Austrian Galicia, occupied by the Russian army at the beginning of the war, and also those of Russia itself. The war thus was a war of revenge for Kishinev; that is, for the pogroms in Russia. Such a definition of the war meant that Jews could fight both as loyal, patriotic citizens of Austria and also for a specific Jewish cause at the same time. In their sermons and writings, rabbis cogently expressed this wartime ideology, which persisted even after the Central Powers defeated Russia. Then rabbis, indeed Jewish spokesmen in general, understood the war in terms of guaranteeing the survival of the Habsburg Monarchy which protected the Jews from anti-Semitism and the dangers of nationalism.

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Gail Finney

Where better to begin talking about Viennese identity in the late twentieth century than in the work of Elfriede Jelinek and Thomas Bernhard—specifically, in two plays whose titles immediately evoke the city as well as pregnant moments in its history: Jelinek's Burgtheater (published 1982; premiered 1985 in Bonn) and Bernhard's Heldenplatz (premiered 1988 in Vienna's Burgtheater). Insofar as the two plays dramatize the extent to which National Socialism took hold and persisted in Austria, they epitomize both authors' perennial roles as keen observers and harsh critics of Austrian society. Burgtheater and the scandal it generated established Jelinek's function as "Nestbeschmutzerin," whereas Heldenplatz, appearing the year before Bernhard's death, can be regarded as the capstone of his career as a critic of Austrian mores and politics.