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Rosemary Wakeman Paris Dreams, Paris Memories: The City and Its Mystique by Charles Rearick

Shannon L. Fogg France under Fire: German Invasion, Civilian Flight, and Family Survival during World War II by Nicole Dombrowski Risser

Elizabeth Campbell Karlsgodt Divided Memory: French Recollections of World War II from the Liberation to the Present by Olivier Wieviorka

Jennifer Anne Boittin French Primitivism and the Ends of Empire, 1945–1975 by Daniel J. Sherman

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Jeffrey Jackson The Place de la Bastille: The Story of a Quartier by Keith Reader

Carol E. Harrison Heroes and Legends of Fin-de-siècle France: Gender, Politics, and National Identity by Venita Datta

Marie-Emmanuelle Chessel Women and Mass Consumer Society in Postwar France by Rebecca Pulju

Mark Ingram Trade of the Tricks: Inside the Magician's Craft by Graham Jones

Pepper D. Culpepper Contingent Capital: Short-Term Investors and the Evolution of Corporate Governance in France and Germany by Michel Goyer

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Whitney Walton The Virtuous Marketplace: Women and Men, Money and Politics in Paris, 1830-1870 by Victoria E. Thompson

Catherine Bertho Lavenir Marketing Michelin: Advertising and Cultural Identity in Twentieth-Century France by Stephen L. Harp

Robert O. Paxton France: The Dark Years, 1940-44 by Julian Jackson

Marianne in Chains by Robert Gildea

Gérard Grunberg François Mitterrand: The Last French President by Ronald Tiersky

Martin A. Schain The Dignity of Working Men by Michèle Lamont

Public Attitudes Toward Immigration in the United States, France and Germany by Joel S. Fetzer

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Geneviève Giroux

This article analyzes references to history and, a fortiori, to memory in official French discourse during and after German unification. It shows that the understanding of the past complies, in every sense of the word, with France's European policy. Entirely oriented towards the promotion and justification of the European future, official memory distorts some historical facts in order to exorcise the present of a cumbersome past. Because it serves as a means of deferring to the national interest rather than as an end in itself, this representation of the past shows the limits of the official memory.

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Memorial

Allan Mitchell, 1933—2016

Volker Berghahn

Allan Mitchell, the renowned historian of Franco-German relations in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, passed away on 30 October 2016, after an operation from which he sadly did not recover. Allan was among those historians whose contributions

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Matisse at Vence

An Epilogue to Van Gogh and Gauguin: the Search for Sacred Art

Kenneth E. Silver

Silverman's intent is to emphasize the "critical role of religion in the development of modernism." As an addendum to that pursuit, it should be pointed out that, well into the twentieth century, religion remained crucial to artistic innovation and development (and still is). We now recognize how important apocalyptic imagery was to Wasily Kandinsky's abstraction. In the wake of the Second World War, and French occupation by the Germans, religion made a powerful reappearance in the art of the avant-garde. Henri Matisse's Chapel of the Rosary at Vence is one of the great works of this period; it is worth briefly examining the ways in which Matisse understood the intersection between modern art and his reengagement with Catholicism.

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Leora Auslander Marianne in the Market: Envisioning Consumer Society in Fin-de-Siècle France by Lisa Tiersten

Rebecca Rogers Disruptive Acts: The New Woman in Fin-de-Siècle France by Mary Louise Roberts

Jeffrey H. Jackson Django: The Life and Music of a Gypsy Legend by Michael Dregni

Jean-Philippe Mathy Camus & Sartre: The Story of a Friendship and the Quarrel That Ended It by Ronald Aronson

Joel Revill The Seduction of Unreason: The Intellectual Romance with Fascism from Nietzsche to Postmodernism by Richard Wolin

Scott Gunther Liberté, égalité, sexualités: Actualité politique des questions sexuelles by Clarisse Fabre and Eric Fassin

Alec G. Hargreaves Muslims and the State in Britain, France and Germany by Joel S. Fetzer and J. Christopher Soper

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From Republican Political Culture to Republican Democracy

The Benefits and Burdens of History

Dick Howard

Marx called France the political nation par excellence, as contrasted to economic England and philosophical Germany. But Marx arrived at his mature theory only after a stern critique of a “merely political” view of revolution. And some of his most important insights are developed in analyses of the failures of revolution in France. While Marx’s observation is insightful, the theoretical conclusions he drew from it are problematic. The monarchy in France was not absolute because it was all-powerful or arbitrary; its power came from the means by which it dominated all spheres of life, transforming an administrative and territorial entity into a political nation. In the wake of the Revolution, the republican tradition became equally absolute; it came to define what the French mean by the political (a concept whose use differs from what “Anglo-Saxons” define as politics).

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What Do the French Think of Us?

The Deteriorating Image of the United States, 2000-2004

Richard Kuisel

What do the French think of Americans and the United States? This is a grand question whose answer reveals a crucial dimension of the current tension in Franco-American relations. It is also a question that can be answered reasonably well. Transatlantic troubles have stirred interest in ascertaining the state of public opinion. The result is an extraordinary number of comprehensive surveys conducted over the last five years. The US Department of State, for example, has systematically monitored French attitudes. So have many French and American polling agencies like SOFRES, CSA, and the Pew Center. Foundations like the French-American Foundation and the German Marshall Fund of the US have also sponsored research. Between fifteen and twenty thousand Frenchmen and women have recorded their opinion in such surveys. This evidence provides a unique opportunity for research into how the man- or woman-in-the-street views the United States.

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Les entreprises françaises face au occupants (1940–1944)

Entre collaboration, opportunisme et « nécessité de vivre »

Sébastien Durand

Amid severe shortages of raw materials, labor, and transportation, companies in occupied France (1940–1944) sought alternative paths to what is commonly called “economic collaboration.” They worked to find substitute supplies, convert to new product lines, alter their manufacturing methods, and even adapt to the black market. But few businesses could avoid the question of whether to provide goods and services to the occupier. The opportunities to do so were widespread, though they varied according to occupation, economic branch, and the passage of time during the Occupation. The German occupiers thus benefited from the French economy. With decisive help from the Vichy regime, the occupiers managed to force, induce, or entice French enterprises into their war economy—be they large industries formerly mobilized for French national defense, small and medium-sized firms, or agricultural producers.