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Native Marriage “Soviet” and “Russian” Style

The Political Economy of Desire and Competing Matrimonial Emotions

Vera Skvirskaja

This article proposes an alternative perspective on the debate on “native families,” and marriage strategies and choices, among rural Nenets on the Yamal Peninsula in Arctic Siberia. 1 It departs from the common narrative put forward by both

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John P. Ziker

This paper discusses flexibility in subsistence and exchange strategies and family and community structures in an indigenous community on the lower Enisei River in north-central Siberia. An analysis of available data on mobility, resource use, and social and economic exchanges contributes to understanding the factors that affect resilience of indigenous domestic groups and communities in the region. The historic flexibility of economic strategies and related social structure is described on the basis of data from the 1926/27 Polar Census. Data from the author's 1997 visit to the area (the Tukhard community) illustrates very similar strategies and variation in deployment of these strategies. New patterns of organization are discussed in relation to the issues of community resilience and indigenous rights.

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Uralic Imaginations on Film

Markku Lehmuskallio and Anastasia Lapsui in Siberia and the Circumpolar World

Kathleen Osgood

Starting with instructional films about Finnish forestry in the 1970s, Markku Lehmuskallio has taken his cinematic vision progressively northward. After the fall of the Soviet Union, Leh mus kallio started intensive work among the Nenets, ultimately collaborating with Anastasia Lapsui to make remarkable “film poems“ among northern peoples at the edges of the world. Perhaps most impressive of their extensive Giron Film productions are the awardwinning Seven Songs of the Tundra (2000) and Earth Evocation (2009). This review essay focuses on their methods of representation of northern, native peoples over the course of their filmmaking career.

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Population Change in the Periphery

Changing Migration Patterns in the Russian North

Timothy Heleniak

This article examines changes in the migration system in the Russian North over the two decades since the breakup of the Soviet Union and the beginning of economic reforms using unpublished data from the Federal State Statistics Service of Russia. This is done by computing several measures of migration for selected northern regions: 1) measures of migration efficiency to determine the extent to which migration in the northern regions is redistributing the population; 2) migration transition probabilities to measure changes in the origins and destinations of migrants in the Russian North; and 3) the average distance of moves to determine the effects that increased costs of transportation have on migration. The regions examined in this article include Khanty-Mansi and Iamal-Nenets Autonomous Okrugs, Chukotka Autonomous Okrug and Magadan Oblast', and Murmansk Oblast'. The findings show that as the market has taken hold, regions of economic growth are becoming primary migration destinations for persons migrating both to and from the North.

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A Booming City in the Far North

Demographic and Migration Dynamics of Yakutsk, Russia

Svetlana Sukneva and Marlene Laruelle

Many cities of Russia’s Far North face a massive population decline, with the exception of those based on oil and gas extraction in the Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous District. Yet, there is one more exception to that trend: the city of Yakutsk, capital of the Sakha (Yakutia) Republic, whose population is booming, having grown from 186,000 in 1989 to 338,000 in 2018, This unique demographic dynamism is founded on the massive exodus of the ethnic Yakut population from rural parts of the republic to the capital city, a process that has reshaped the urban cultural landscape, making Yakutsk a genuine indigenous regional capital, the only one of its kind in the Russian Far North.

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Konstantin Klokov

over most of Siberia. However, in certain regions regional domestic reindeer stock shows a steady tendency for growth (e.g., the Nenets tundra reindeer herding area in northwest Siberia). There are also regions where reindeer stock was sharply reduced

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Editorial

Past and Present

Matthew P. Romaniello

translates the article in order to highlight its importance both to the Soviet Union and also for current scholarship. It is not a coincidence that this issue also features Vera Skvirskaja’s discussion of marriage practices among the Nenets community. Current

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Uliana Vinokurova

Translator : Tatiana Argounova-Low

This article presents results of various research projects 1 conducted in various regions of the Russian Federation, including Sakha (Yakutia), Buryatia, Gornyi Altai, Khakassiia, and the Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous okrug between 2001 and 2014

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Valeria V. Vasilyeva

second day there was a strong focus on mobility (in its very different forms). Kirill Istomin focused on the role of emotions in the orientation practices among Nenets and Komi. He argued that fear can be significantly destructive because the most

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Matthew P. Romaniello

their customs and lifestyles in the post-Soviet world. Tatiana Vagramenko discusses the ongoing evangelization efforts among the Nenets in order to explain the growing influence of fundamentalist Baptists in northwestern Russia. We look forward to