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Stephen Prince

In this issue of Projections , Dan Flory examines issues of race in film from a singular angle. He is interested in understanding how disgust reactions, manifested by viewers in relation to characters and situations, are inflected by racial

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Jess Dorrance

W. E. B. Du Bois's album Types of American Negroes, Georgia, U.S.A. as shown in Shawn Michelle Smith's book Photography on the Color Line: W. E. B. Du Bois, Race, and Visual Culture (2004). Image courtesy of the artists. The third

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Andrew J. Ball

and sexuality studies, and in critical race and ethnic studies. These many disciplinary and topical elements are elegantly assembled in this issue's special section entitled “Queer Sinofuturisms.” We are particularly excited to contribute to the

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Redefining Representation

Black Trans and Queer Women’s Digital Media Production

Moya Bailey

health and social needs are addressed—unlike with other types of difference, such as race—the use of such hashtags as #girlslikeus allows for a network where this information can be dispensed, even with anonymity. In addition, transitioning “vlogs” or

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Peter Lurie, Antonio Sanna, Hansen Hsu, Ella Houston, and Kristof van Baarle

Alice Maurice, The Cinema and Its Shadow: Race and Technology in Early Cinema (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2013), 288 pp. + 30 b&w photos. ISBN 978-0-8166-7805-1 (paperback, $25), 978-0-8166-7804-1 (hardback, $75). Reviewed

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Editorial

Situating Screen Bodies

Brian Bergen-Aurand

On the Cover Figure 1 Love Has No Gender, Race or Sexuality. Boitumelo and Collen. (August 2017) . This cover of Screen Bodies features a photograph by Collen Mfazwe entitled “Love Has No Gender, Race or Sexuality. Boitumelo and

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Linda Howell, Ryan Bell, Laura Helen Marks, Jennifer L. Lieberman, and Joseph Christopher Schaub

sexuality, race, age, and suffering thread throughout the collection. In Growing Pains, writers consider Marilyn Monroe, Natalie Wood, and Harrison Ford as case studies in the suffering that comes with aging in Hollywood. While Monroe and Ford represent the

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Lieke Hettinga and Terrance Wooten

. Steinbock argues that sex “can be a site in which a felt sense of one's gendered, raced body can become sutured to an imperfect, wavering w/hole, not reducible to genitals or skin” (65). By exploring a medium heavily invested in the exposure of sex and

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Looking for Something to Signify

Something to Signify Gender Performance and Cuban Masculinity in Viva

David Yagüe González

world is a stage, not multiple stages. Therefore, notions of race, nationality, or class were not considered until much later in the critical thinking process, until, that is, the introduction of queer of color critique. As Roderick Ferguson would

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Groped and Gutted

Hollywood's Hegemonic Reimagining of Counterculture

Samantha Eddy

's commitment to white-male authority. Molina-Guzman finds that Hollywood productions can be consumed by mixed-gender and mixed-race audiences for the purposes of maximum profit. Yet ultimately, the white-male imagination behind the screen leads to the