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Industrialising Print, Sport, and Authorship

Nimrod, Surtees, and the New Sporting Magazine

Yuri Cowan

In the early Victorian period, sporting literature found a new audience among the young century's industrialists and prosperous merchants who, enabled by the growth of the railroads and increased access to the countryside, chose to use their increased leisure time to experience English rural life and to hobnob on equal terms, at least superficially, with the rural ancien régime. The New Sporting Magazine, established in 1831, positioned itself to speak both to the existing devotees of sport and to the middle-class audience which was about to make its presence felt in the field. The parallel refinement of English sport and its print discourse is described by and exemplified in the two best-known sport writers of the early Victorian era: Robert Smith Surtees and Charles Apperley ('Nimrod'). Surtees and Nimrod, though highly professional and well remunerated, habitually put forward their own work as 'correspondence', contributing to the illusion that the magazine was a playground for gentlemen of leisure. The careful blend of the conservative and modern in the New Sporting Magazine thus extends to its contributors as well: in this magazine's pages the eighteenth-century culture of the gentleman correspondent was beginning to merge with the culture of the paid celebrity author that would become such a force in the mass literary environment of the nineteenth century.

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David Nicol

dramatization of the lives of Captain John Smith, the governor of Jamestown, and Pocahontas, the daughter of Chief Powhatan who married the plantation owner John Rolfe and became a celebrity in London before her untimely death in 1616. The revelation of this

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Kavita Mudan Finn

wasn’t nearly enough of a celebrity to merit the front page. Four trips in and out of rehab, arrested using any kind of drug you could imagine, and weaseling out of jail because his family owned Broome Investments and had more money than God. Not to

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Walter Benjamin

The Consolation of History in a Paris Exile

Patrick H. Hutton

Walter Benjamin, a Jewish German literary critic of modest reputation during the interwar years, has become an intellectual celebrity in our times. In flight from Nazi Germany, he took refuge in Paris during the 1930s before dying in 1940 in a vain effort to escape to America. In this essay, I analyze his ideas as conceived in his Paris exile, with particular attention to his turn to the topics of memory and of history and of the relationship between them. I close with some thoughts on how his ideas about memory's redeeming power played into the humanist Marxism of the intellectuals of the 1960s and subsequently the preoccupation with memory in late twentieth-century scholarship.

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The Miserable, Mythical, Magical Marmiton

Representing Culinary Apprenticeship in Early Third Republic France

Michael D. Garval

Revealing paradoxes abounded in early Third Republic French representations of the marmiton, or culinary apprentice. Investigative reportage and reformist discourse exposed apprentices’ miserable existence while still depicting these young fellows as playful and carefree. Conversely, popular marmiton mythology, particularly in children’s literature, idealized culinary apprenticeship, amid glimpses of harsh living and working conditions, while also highlighting admittedly rare opportunities for ambitious apprentices to achieve substantial public success. Max Jacob’s children’s book Histoire du Roi Kaboul Ier et du Marmiton Gauwain provides an emblematic example with its parodic fairy-tale rendering of celebrity chef Auguste Escoffier’s extraordinary triumphs. Ultimately, while enchanting, the rosy popular vision of the magical marmiton obfuscated exploitative child labor practices underpinning the whole culinary enterprise in this supposed golden age of French gastronomy.

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Brian Yothers, Gillian Dooley, Guy Galazka, Peter Weisensel, Jackie Coon, Magdalena Banaszkiewicz, and David Cashman

liminal space in that they are spaces for discovery and reflection—indeed the space that Morales occupies herself. She argues that the cult of celebrities has become a new form of “religion” together with ferociously devout followers, dismissive

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Michael Hughes

, achieving a kind of celebrity status which meant that he could not be easily ignored. His scare-mongering about the threat posed to Britain by invasion from abroad before 1914 became part of a national discourse that emphasised the country's vulnerability in

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The Mysterious Mr Le Queux

War Novelist, Defence Publicist and Counterspy

Roger T. Stearn

much about his life today remains mysterious. His Who's Who entries, his interviews with popular magazines, his memoirs Things I Know about Kings, Celebrities and Crooks (1923) and, largely copied from them, the ‘official biography’ by Norman St

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Radical Reactionary

The Politics of William Le Queux

Harry Wood

echoed almost word for word in his problematic autobiography Things I Know about Kings, Celebrities, and Crooks. In the chapter ‘Spies and Spying’, he insisted that he approached the subject ‘without politics … for I am no politician, and have never

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Introduction

‘William Le Queux, Master of Misinformation’

Ailise Bulfin and Harry Wood

smattering of mentions in literary reference works. 5 Published in 1923, Things I Know about Kings, Celebrities and Crooks is the closest Le Queux came to writing an autobiography. 6 Though marketed as such, the book is best approached as an extension of