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Staging Sassoun

Memory and Music Video in Post-Soviet Armenia

Rik Adriaans

in the Republic of Armenia. 7 The affective spectrum—from exilic nostalgia to militant irredentism—that video producers seek to engage is by no means entirely the result of the ideological molding or ‘mass deception’ carried out by the culture

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Introduction

Hierarchy, Value, and the Value of Hierarchy

Naomi Haynes and Jason Hickel

Dependence in Central Uganda . Chicago : University of Chicago Press . 10.7208/chicago/9780226119700.001.0001 Smith , Daniel J. 2007 . A Culture of Corruption: Everyday Deception and Popular Discontent in Nigeria . Princeton, NJ : Princeton University

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Austrian “Gypsies” in the Italian archives

Historical ethnography on multiple border crossings at the beginning of the twentieth century

Paola Trevisan

, and would like to have, cross(ed) gave rise to discussions and deceptions between the Italian and Austrian authorities. At certain points, it seems as though you are witnessing a chess game in which the victor is the one who does not admit the “Gypsies

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Dangerous speculation

The appeal of pyramid schemes in rural Siberia

Leonie Schiffauer

John Comaroff , 1 – 56 . Durham, NC : Duke University Press . 10.1215/9780822380184 Cox , John 2016 . “Value and the art of deception: Public morality in a Papua New Guinean Ponzi scheme.” In Anthropologies of value: Cultures of accumulation

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To Smile and Not to Smile

Mythic Gesture at the Russia-China Border

Caroline Humphrey

have coagulated into mythic forms. The first, as mentioned earlier, concerns the notion of the state border itself—the acute suspicion cultivated by the security agencies that this line is where ‘foreignness’, associated with enmity and deception

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The emergence of the global debt society

Governmentality and profit extraction through fabricated abundance and imposed scarcity in Peru and Spain

Ismael Vaccaro, Eric Hirsch, and Irene Sabaté

predictions of and clear deceptions about present and future wealth (what we call “fabricated abundance”) that translated on the inability to repay the debt generated by these profit expectations; and (3) the recipe to solve each of these economically

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Blurred memories

War and disaster in a Buddhist Sinhala village

Mara Benadusi

that outsiders be complicit and participate in reproducing the deception and appearances of truth, not that they be believed. Navigating the rocky path of uncertainty in village life required the use of “uninhibited research methods” ( Bouchetoux 2014

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From behind stall doors

Farming the Eastern German countryside in the animal welfare era

Amy Leigh Field

press for poor conditions. As the chief editor of a local agricultural press also put it: “We do also lie quite a lot: the cows on milk packaging for example, it's all deception, and it's easy to find out that cows aren't raised the way they're depicted

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Gramsci in and beyond resistances

The search for an autonomous political initiative among a subaltern group in the Beninese savanna

Riccardo Ciavolella

deception with the promises of development, politics, and national association explains this reorientation to self-reliance ( sagoo ), where openings to the outer world are considered the necessary strategy for recovering a form of political, economic

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“My Visa Application Was Denied, I Decided to Go Anyway”

Interpreting, Experiencing, and Contesting Visa Policies and the (Im)mobility Regime in Algeria

Farida Souiah

This article explores the ways people targeted by restrictive migration and mobility policies in Algeria experience, interpret, and contest them. It focuses on the perspective of harragas, literally “those who burn” the borders. In the Maghrebi dialects, this is notably how people leaving without documentation are referred to. It reflects the fact that they do not respect the mandatory steps for legal departure. Also, they figuratively “burn” their papers to avoid deportation once in Europe. Drawing on qualitative fieldwork, this article outlines the complex and ambiguous attitudes toward the legal mobility regime of those it aims to exclude: compliance, deception, delegitimization, and defiance. It contributes to debates about human experiences of borders and inequality in mobility regimes. It helps deepen knowledge on why restrictive migration and mobility policies fail and are often counterproductive, encouraging the undocumented migration they were meant to deter.