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Marcus Otto

This article analyzes how the fundamental challenge of decolonization has resonated in history textbooks published in France since the 1960s. It therefore contextualizes textbook knowledge within different areas of society and focuses on predominant discourses that influenced history textbooks' (post)colonial representations in the period examined. These discourses encompass the crisis of Western civilization, modernization, republican integration, and the postcolonial politics of memory. The author argues that history textbooks have thus become media, as well as objects of an emerging postcolonial politics of memory that involves intense conflicts over immigration and national identity and challenges France's (post)colonial legacy in general.

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African Dawn

Keïta Fodéba and the Imagining of National Culture in Guinea

Andrew W. M. Smith

their author, Keïta Fodéba. In the difference between these editions lies a fascinating insight into the complicated narrative of decolonization and the many varied strands upon which it drew. 4 Independence was not an immediate break that forbade

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Ghassan Hage

This thought-provoking collection of articles treats the decolonization of the university from a variety of perspectives. It explores a wide variety of issues starting with the decolonization of the content of the curriculum and up to the

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Margareta von Oswald and Verena Rodatus

The decolonization of research won’t be possible without the decolonization of minds. … I think that we [as a research team] took a step in the right direction, but one can’t say that this will continue or become regular. It’s only going to be

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Decolonizing Cambridge University

A Participant Observer’s View

Keith Hart

When I read about the petition to ‘decolonize’ Cambridge University’s English literature syllabus, my first question was, ‘Why are they using the term for independence from empire preferred by the departing colonial powers?’ Then, ‘Why is a post

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Girls with Disabilities in the Global South

Rethinking the Politics of Engagement

Xuan Thuy Nguyen

can transform all forms of exclusion, we need to address the challenges of visual approaches critically to understand the extent to which methods such as drawing and photovoice can address inclusion and exclusion. Decolonizing Methodologies

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Decolonizing Development in Diné Bikeyah

Resource Extraction, Anti-Capitalism, and Relational Futures

Melanie K. Yazzie

Development, Decolonization, and National Liberation With this article, I hope to make a significant contribution both to the traditions of Diné resistance that seek to carry Diné life into the future and to the careful scholarly work that has been

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Giuliana Chamedes and Elizabeth A. Foster

Scholarly attention to decolonization in the French Empire and beyond has largely focused on the political transitions from colonies to nation-states. This introduction, and the essays in this special issue, present new ways of looking at decolonization by examining how religious communities and institutions imagined and experienced the end of French Empire. This approach adds valuable perspectives obscured by historiographical emphasis on French republican secularism and on the workings of the colonial state. Bringing together histories of religion and decolonization sheds new light on the late colonial period and the early successor states of the French empire. It also points to the importance of international institutions and transnational religious communities in the transitions at the end of empire.

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Dis-orienting Western Knowledge

Coloniality, Curriculum and Crisis

Zeus Leonardo

process of decolonization. This article first briefly introduces the field of curriculum studies, an area of scholarship that has a long history in the educational literature. Then, it transitions to Said’s oeuvre, an opening that provides a theory of

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Contradictions of Solidarity

Whiteness, Settler Coloniality, and the Mainstream Environmental Movement

Joe Curnow and Anjali Helferty

, Flowers argues that “settler decolonization is itself a self-interested process in the desire for recognition by the colonized” (2015: 37) and that this move by settlers to seek affirmation repurposes Indigenous activism in service to resolving settler