Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 905 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All
Open access

Afterword

Putting Together the Anthropology of Tax and the Anthropology of Ethics

Soumhya Venkatesan

This afterword combines commentary on the articles that make up this special issue with my own research on small-state, low-tax right-wing activists to bring the anthropology of tax and taxation in conversation with the anthropology of ethics. I

Restricted access

Holocaust Ethics

Difficult Histories and Threatening Memories

Victor Jeleniewski Seidler

On the seventieth anniversary of the destruction of the Vilna ghetto I explore ambivalences in Holocaust memory in the Baltic states and troubling notions of a 'double genocide' while tracing train journeys of death that connected Vienna, Vilna and Tallinn and so western and eastern Europe. Exploring how memories are connected to place and investigating how family legacies of Litvak identity also travel, I show how Musar ethical traditions also journeyed as far as South Africa to influence the ethical politics of the African National Congress. Framing questions about the relationship between ethics and memory across generations I return to the painful warnings in the words of Elchanan Elkes at the destruction of the Kovno ghetto. I trace the possibilities that they help to frame a post-Shoah ethics and a vision of 'the human' that questions the rational self that informed Enlightenment thinking and that proved incapable of resisting the brutalities of Nazism.

Restricted access

Introduction

Lenience in Systems of Religious Meaning and Practice

Maya Mayblin and Diego Malara

in relation to projects of piety, ethics, and selfhood. Thus, it provides a well-elaborated field of debate to which explorations of lenience may be interposed. Lenience abounds—we only have to look for it. What, we ask, would a diffuse, widespread

Restricted access

‘Sensuous Singularity’

Hamish Fulton’s Cairngorm Walk-Texts

Alan Macpherson

, specifically for an environmental ethics. Bennett’s argument for enchantment responds to what she diagnoses as the prevailing disenchantment narratives of modernity, which she traces through, among others, Max Weber, Hans Blumenberg and Simon Critchley. 8 A

Restricted access

Decolonizing Anthropology

Reflections from Cambridge

Heidi Mogstad and Lee-Shan Tse

. Despite sustained critical attention to the ethics and politics of anthropological knowledge production, the discipline can still be justifiably accused of silencing and misrecognizing the work of Southern and minoritized scholars both outside and within

Free access

Lolita Speaks

Disrupting Nabokov’s “Aesthetic Bliss”

Michele Meek

acknowledge the girl’s sexual desire and agency. Aesthetics or Ethics? In his 1959 essay, “On a Book Entitled Lolita ,” Nabokov argues that the sole purpose of Lolita is “aesthetic bliss,” which he defines as “a sense of being somehow, somewhere, connected

Restricted access

The Better Part of Stolen Valour

Counterfeits, Comedy and the Supreme Court

David Currell

condensed via the ethical analysis of valour and imposture in Aristotle, the crucial intermediary between Homer and humanism. 23 A key passage is Aristotle’s discussion of courage at Nicomachean Ethics 1115a6–17b22. 24 The approach is both quantitative

Full access

An Unpublished Manuscript by Durkheim

‘On the General Physics of Law and Morality, 4th Year of the Course, 1st Lecture, December 2, 1899, Course Outline: On Penal Sanctions’

Émile Durkheim, edited and translated by François Pizarro Noël, and Ronjon Paul Datta

consciousness. 8 This part of ethics can be called objective ethics. The rules, in effect, are not the work of each of us; we find them all ready-made for the most part, and what we can add to them in the course of life is infinitely little. Besides, it is not

Open access

David Lempert

nothing to ensure that those whom it educates at any level, or who are members of anthropological organisations and who work as professionals, take any enforceable oath of any kind to international law and to the ethics of the profession when they work in

Restricted access

Julia A. King

material (a goal of what has been called “digital repatriation” or “digital return”; see Bell et al. 2013 and Geismar 2014 ). Indeed, the Society for American Archaeology’s Code of Ethics encourages archaeologists to relinquish what it describes as