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Paul Apostolidis, William E. Connolly, Jodi Dean, Jade Schiff, and Romand Coles

metastasizing capitalism. These currents are connected in relationships of reciprocal amplification with the affective politics of fear, ressentiment, and rage that Connolly terms the “evangelical-capitalist resonance machine.” Trump is both made possible by and

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Free from State Violence or Free to Comply?

A Revised Typology of Coercion and Repression in Liberal Democracies

Barbora Capinska

repression-free and this claim supports a myth that their citizens can exercise their rights and influence their lives freely and without fear of negative sanction only because they do not experience direct state violence. On the other hand, this

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Alexander Weiss

allow for democracy, he argued ( Chakrabarty 2019 ). Gandhi, his main opponent during the conferences, was concerned about India's (Hindu-dominated) cultural and spiritual cohesion, and he feared an increasing division of society when not only

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Struggles over Expertise

Practices of Politicization and Depoliticization in Participatory Democracy

Taina Meriluoto

idea with a colleague from our local branch, they acclaimed in slight horror: “But [if we were to listen to everyone] then there's no telling what kind of ideas they might have!” The quote summarizes several fears that my colleagues held: they had

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Pluralist Democracy and Non-Ideal Democratic Legitimacy

Against Functional and Global Solutions to the Boundary Problem in Democratic Theory

Tom Theuns

, which, given the centrality of accountability to democracy, undermines the possibility of democratic government. One classic, liberal, response to a global state stems from the fear that centralizing all political power in one institution would lead to

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Against Analogy

Why Analogical Arguments in Support of Workplace Democracy Must Necessarily Fail

Roberto Frega

. Forde , Chris , Gary Slater and David A Spencer . 2006 . “ Fearing the worst? Threat, participation and workplace productivity .” Economic and Industrial democracy 27 ( 3 ): 369 – 398 . 10.1177/0143831X06065961 Freeman , Steven . 2007

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Derek Hook and Clifford L. Staples

Climate of Fear: The Quest for Dignity in a Dehumanized World (The BBC Reith Lectures) Derek Hook

Racism: A Short History Clifford L. Staples

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Civil Disobedience and Terrorism

Testing the Limits of Deliberative Democracy

Michael Allen

This article explores the boundaries of the commitment of deliberative democrats to communication and persuasion over threats and intimidation through examining the hard cases of civil disobedience and terrorism. The case of civil disobedience is challenging as deliberative democrats typically support this tactic under certain conditions, yet such a move threatens to blur the Habermasian distinction between instrumental and communicative action that informs many accounts of deliberative democracy. However, noting that civil disobedience is deemed acceptable to many deliberative democrats so long as it remains 'relevantly tied to the objective of communicative action', Allen holds that certain kinds of terrorism cannot be ruled out either. Whilst acknowledging that the deliberative democrat cannot really justify taking life as a tactic to induce deliberation, as 'dead people cannot deliberate', Allen notes that this does not rule out terrorism per se, the object of which is not death so much as generating overwhelming fear. Further, while a permanent condition of fear would set limits on deliberation, limited and temporary physical harm to persons need not. This implies that deliberative democrats must explain why intentionally causing some physical harm to property or persons is always an illegitimate form of communication.

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The U.S. Economic Crisis

A Marxian Analysis

Richard D. Wolff

The U.S. economy’s high-tech sector (internet, computers, telecommunications, etc.) burst its classic speculative bubble in 2000. The Nasdaq stock market lost 40 per cent of its value during the year and lost another 20 per cent in the first quarter of 2001. The Nasdaq dragged down most other stock market indicators in the U.S. Trillions of dollars in U.S. wealth vanished. The wealthiest citizens turned away from the stock market as rapid losses replaced the absurdly high gains of 1999. Other U.S. citizens watched in horror as their recent expansions of securities holdings rapidly shrank in value (also confronting many with vanished savings and reduced retirement benefits since their pensions were invested in ‘history’s greatest boom’). See Appendix 5 for the details on U.S. stock ownership patterns. Industries began to scale back their investment programs as rapid growth shifted to slow growth and recession loomed. The majority of workers slowed their spending and their accumulation of debt because of falling stock prices and because they fear a recession’s impact on wages, benefits, and job security. All these negative developments are continuing into 2001.

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Jodi Dean

signs said that fear was the real virus, that COVID-19 was a “test run at socialism.” On April 30 armed white demonstrators were allowed to enter the Michigan state house. Some on the far right, including the US president, politicized masks. From the