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Invisible Veterans

Defeated Militants and Enduring Revolutionary Social Values in Dhufar, Oman

Alice Wilson

other sensitive research contexts, leaving certain things and questions unspoken can be an important part of fieldwork ( Malkki 1995: 51 ). I let interlocutors set the boundaries of discussion and of their willingness to share or withhold their own

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Philippine Prison Marriages

The Politics of Kinship and Women's Composite Agency

Sif Lehman Jensen

and to what extent it can help us understand the women's choice of marriage. Organization and Relational Entanglements of Prison Marriages I first became acquainted with this group of women during previous fieldwork among women political

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Staying out of Place

The Being and Becoming of Burundian Refugees in the Camp and the City

Simon Turner

fieldwork carried out in a refugee camp in Tanzania in 1997–1998 and six years later among Burundians living clandestinely in Nairobi. Although originally part of two different research projects—one exploring issues of governance, politics, and masculinities

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Achieving the Ordinary

Everyday Peace and the Other in Bosnian Mixed-Ethnicity Families

Keziah Conrad

between insiders and outsiders. Tone Bringa, who did her fieldwork in a mixed Muslim-Catholic village in central Bosnia in the late 1980s, describes a network of reciprocity among neighbors of both communities, who exchanged various kinds of support and

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To Be or Not to Be a Hero

Recognition and Citizenship among Disabled Veterans of the Sri Lankan Army

Matti Weisdorf and Birgitte Refslund Sørensen

amusement of the interlocutors, was turning increasingly “brown” and “ugly” during fieldwork—initially marked the ethnographer's presence out as not only foreign but also suspicious and potentially dangerous, given the suffocating, tense political climate of

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Liminality and Missing Persons

Encountering the Missing in Postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina

Laura Huttunen

such hauntingly potent symbols for reassessing the moral order while simultaneously making their “political lives” (to quote Verdery) ambiguous. This article is based on ethnographic fieldwork among families of missing persons both in Finland and Bosnia

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Unbecoming Veteranship

Convicted Military Officers in Post-authoritarian Argentina

Eva van Roekel and Valentina Salvi

understandable considering the war crimes they have been convicted for. Since 2004, we have conducted ethnographic fieldwork among the now convicted military officers and their kin to make sense of their current position within Argentinian society and the

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“I Showed You What I Thought Was Appropriate”

Reflections on Longitudinal Ethnographic Research and the Performativity of Dutch Gang Life

Robert A. Roks

This article highlights some aspects of doing longitudinal ethnography in criminology. By zooming in and reflecting on some of the key moments and methodological choices made over the course of more than 15 years of fieldwork among members of a Dutch gang, this article illustrates that relations with informants have the potential to strengthen over time, but that building rapport and trust with (active) offenders is not necessarily a linear process. In addition to voicing the emotional and evocative aspects of these methodological deliberations, this “true confession” is meant to spark some more debate on how longitudinal fieldwork in criminology impacts field relations by critically examining not only the performativity of informants, but also of researchers.

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Democratization of Perpetration

Human Rights, Transitional Justice, and Memories of Resistance in Post-Conflict Timor-Leste

Amy Rothschild

This article examines the effects of human rights and transitional justice on memories of Timor-Leste’s resistance to the Indonesian occupation, which lasted from 1975 to 1999. Data comes from ethnographic fieldwork in Timor, centered around remembrance of two major acts of resistance: an armed uprising in 1983 and a peaceful demonstration in 1991. The article argues that in Timor, an “apolitical” human rights has caused a post-conflict “democratization of perpetration”, in that similar culpability is assigned to all those who caused suffering in the conflict with Indonesia through physical violence, irrespective of context. Transitional justice has thus expanded the category of perpetrator in Timor, to include some who legally used armed resistance against Indonesian rule. Studies of violence have belatedly turned toward examining perpetrators of state terror; this article examines how discourses of human rights and transitional justice shape perceptions of those who resist state terror with violence.

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“What about Last Time?”

Exploring Potentiality in Danish Young Women’s Violent Conflicts

Ann-Karina Henriksen

The article explores how violence as actuality and potentiality shapes the lives of Danish at-risk girls and young women. The article draws on seven months of ethnographic fieldwork in Copenhagen and includes 25 girls and young women aged 13 to 23 who have all experienced using physical violence. Centering on a single young woman’s narrative, violence is analyzed as a meaningful social practice intimately linked to navigating violent social terrains and managing precarious everyday lives characterized by instability and marginalization. Drawing on the concept of potentiality, it is argued that violent interactions are shaped by both the fear of oncoming danger and the desire for powerful social positions. This perspective opens a micro-longitudinal perspective, which explores situational dynamics of violence through time, hereby contributing to micro-sociological studies of violence.