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'A Wrong Port'

Colonial Havana under Northern Eyes

Bonnie Shannon McMullen

This article looks at Havana of 1820 as seen through the eyes of John Howison, a young Scottish surgeon. As well as his accounts of Havana in his travel book Foreign Scenes and Travelling Recreations (1825), Howison distilled his deepest impressions of the city in a short tale in Blackwood's Magazine in 1821 called 'An Adventure in Havana'. Howison's reactions to Roman Catholicism, slavery and colonial government corruption, as well as the coarseness and exploitative nature of many foreign residents and visitors, combine with his repulsion at the pervasive presence of disease and death to present a picture that moves from objective analysis to gothic horror.

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Ann Miller, Patricia Mainardi, Karin Kukkonen, Viviane Alary, Jaqueline Berndt, Tony Venezia, and Jennifer Anderson Bliss

CONFERENCE REVIEW

Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women – Communities of Experience? One-day symposium, JW3, Jewish Community Centre for London, 12 November 2014

BOOK REVIEWS

Thierry Smolderen, The Origins of Comics: From William Hogarth to Winsor McCay, trans. Bart Beaty and Nick Nguyen

Julia Round, Gothic in Comics and Graphic Novels: A Critical Approach

François-Emmanuel Boucher, Sylvain David and Maxime Prévost, eds, Mythologies du superhéros: Histoire, physiologie, géographie, intermédialités

Dan Mazur and Alexander Danner, Comics: A Global History, 1968 to the Present

Annessa Ann Babic, ed., Comics as History, Comics as Literature: Roles of the Comic Book in Scholarship, Society, and Entertainment

Jane Tolmie, ed., Drawing from Life: Memory and Subjectivity in Comic Art

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Dennis Brown, Anna Birch, Eibhlín Evans, and Andrew Maunder

Wyndham Lewis: Painter and Writer Paul Edwards (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2000), ISBN 0–300–08209–6, hardback £40

The Routledge Reader in Politics and Performance, edited by Lizbeth Goodman with Jane de Gay (London: Routledge, 2000), ISBN 0–415–17473–2 paperback £15.99

Seamus Heaney Andrew Murphy (Tavistock: Northcote House, 1996, 2nd Edition, 2000). ISBN 0 7463 09627 paperback £8.99

Women’s Gothic: From Clara Reeve to Mary Shelley E. J. Clery (Tavistock: Northcote House, 2000), ISBN 0 7463 0872 8 paperback £9.99

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Eric S. Rabkin

Frankenstein and Dracula represent two different genres in print but only one in film. The emergence of science fiction from the Gothic exemplifies normal public genre development. The translation of the written Frankenstein and Dracula into film exemplifies genre development as an adaptation both to historical moment and to medium. In both the print and film cases, we can see the same mechanisms by which a genre is not only established in the public sphere but in the mind of a reader or viewer, a dialectic process in which the genre forms and informs reading and viewing and potentially, as a genre, is reformed by reading and viewing. Consideration of cognitive mechanisms involved in verbal and visual cognition shows both the interaction and the typical dominance of the visual, although genre, and hence individual works, can be modified by increasing our focus on the verbal.

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'History to the Defeated'

Women Writers and the Historical Novel in the Thirties

Diana Wallace

The 1930s can be seen as a key turning point in the development of the historical novel: it is during this decade that the historical novel becomes a genre particularly associated with women writers. Women had, of course, written historical novels before. The gothic romances of Ann Radcliffe and her successors have ‘historical’ settings, while Elizabeth Gaskell and George Eliot both wrote historical novels. Baroness Orczy had been producing her Scarlet Pimpernel books since 1905 and Marjorie Bowen’s The Viper of Milan had been a bestseller in 1906. As the 1920s wore on a steady flow of women’s historical fiction gathered pace. Georgette Heyer’s career as a bestselling historical romance writer began with The Black Moth in 1921. Naomi Mitchison published her first historical novel in 1923, while Sheila Kaye-Smith and Mary Webb produced so-called ‘regional’ or ‘rural’ novels which are also set in the past.

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J. Brandon Colvin

People are bad at recognizing liars. Data culled from several psychological experiments demonstrates that even the most well trained individuals – government agents, police officers, and so on – can barely succeed at a 50 percent rate. Lying and deception, however, are fundamental narrative elements in several film genres – particularly the detective film and the female gothic, genres that peaked in popularity in 1940s Hollywood. Considering their real-life lack of proficiency, how do viewers successfully spot deception in such films? Drawing on findings from a handful of experiments, this article brings cognitive psychological concepts to bear on two 1940s films: Out of the Past (1947) and Secret Beyond the Door (1948). The article claims that filmmakers, particularly actors, exaggerate, simplify, and emphasize deception cues to selectively achieve narrative clarification or revelation. This process reveals not only how viewers recognize deception, but how actors stylize real-life behavior in service of narrative and aesthetic priorities.

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Coming Out of the Coffin

The Vampire and Transnationalism in the Twilight and Sookie Stackhouse Series

Deborah Mutch

This article reads Stephenie Meyer's Twilight series and Charlaine Harris's Sookie Stackhouse novels as contemporary developments in the Gothic genre reflecting current issues of group and national identity. It extends the trope of the vampire as a site of national anxiety to a globalised, post 9/11 context where national identity is renegotiated and transformed. In Harris's novels, the vampires reveal themselves as Other to humans but integrate by accepting human definitions of nation and race which are then superceded by globalised trade. In Meyer's series, supposedly discrete groups of humans and non-humans evolve niche groupings that transform and react to the exigencies of history. Drawing upon Bill Ashcroft's use of the term 'articulation' to describe the cognizant construction of identity through the influences of social, national and religious traditions, the contemporary vampire is read as the place where renegotiations of national identity in a transnational era are visible.

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Graham Holderness

Edited by Bryan Loughrey

a wide range of fields and topics in literary and cultural studies. The current issue reflects the growing interest in Gothic Studies, featuring a group of essays on the innovative and influential TV series Penny Dreadful . Other essays included

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The Corpus of London

(Dis)covering the Victorian City

David W. Chapman

obviously have ante-Victorian precedents and post-Victorian accretions. The spires of Westminster Palace are, after all, echoes of medieval Gothic. And the gilded high altar in St. Paul’s Cathedral is Victorian in its conception and far removed from Wren

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“Loving and Cruel, All at the Same Time”

Girlhood Identity in The Craft

Emily Chandler

this she cannot help but stand out as one of the only black students at the school. As the girls become closer, they begin to wear gothic-inspired clothing. Gothic subculture and its fashion was initially derived from nineteenth-century gothic