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Resisting the Demand to Stand

Boys, Bathrooms, Hypospadias, and Interphobic Violence

Celeste E. Orr

When analyzing bathrooms as both a litmus test for biological sex and volatile sites of gender policing, the discrimination that trans, genderqueer, nonbinary, queer, and gender-nonconforming people face are understandably central (see Cavanagh

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Mapping the (Adolescent) Male Body

Queerness, Pedophilia and Perversions in "L.I.E." and "Mysterious Skin"

Sarag E. S. Sinwell

Drawing on the work of Gayle Rubin, Jonathan Dollimore, and B. Ruby Rich, this paper will explore the ways in which Michael Cuesta’s L.I.E. (2000) and Gregg Araki’s Mysterious Skin (2004) portray adolescent male bodies and subjectivities within the context of the queer. Throughout these films, cinematic identification is primarily tied up with the stories of adolescent boys. However, the perverse acts in which they participate (both voluntarily and involuntarily), the inclusion of multiple points of view, and the focus on our own cultural constructions of childhood, adolescent and adult sexualities trace a network of nodes of identification. Thus, I argue that L.I.E. and Mysterious Skin queer identification by imagining a multiplicity, fluidity, and diversity of modes of identification that engage with both the normal and perverse natures of identity, sexuality, and subjectivity.

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Lowry Martin

juxtaposed with Nabil Ayouch's Much Loved (2015), a film that offers strong criticism of the underground sex trade in Morocco—which is particularly supported by rich Saudis. For the purposes of this article, I focus on the representations of queer male

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Queering Virginity

From Unruly Girls to Effeminate Boys

Eftihia Mihelakis

collection of eight essays that seeks to offer a non-linear and queer approach to understanding virginity in literature and popular culture. This volume openly challenges the perceived monopoly of the hymen as the sole signifier of virginity, proposing

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Jess Dorrance

goes, how she is seen or used, and with whom she affiliates. In response, she blames herself. This article thinks with and about Boudry and Lorenz's film and accompanying installation Toxic in order to reflect upon the politics of racialized queer

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Non-normative Bodies, Queer Identities

Marginalizing Queer Girls in YA Dystopian Literature

Miranda A. Green-Barteet and Jill Coste

In this article we consider the absence of queer female protagonists in dystopian Young Adult (YA) fiction and examine how texts with queer protagonists rely on heteronormative frameworks. Often seen as progressive, dystopian YA fiction features rebellious teen girls resisting the restrictive norms of their societies, but it frequently sidelines queerness in favor of heteronormative romance for its predominantly white, able-bodied protagonists. We analyze The Scorpion Rules (2015) and Love in the Time of Global Warming (2013), both of which feature queer girl protagonists, and conclude that these texts ultimately marginalize that queerness. While they offer readers queer female protagonists, they also equate queerness with non-normative bodies and reaffirm heteronormativity. The rebellion of both protagonists effectively distances them from the queer agency they have developed throughout the narratives.

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Nicholas L. Syrett

From the field's very inception, scholars of the queer past have noted, though sometimes in passing, the centrality of age asymmetry in structuring how same-sex sex has been understood and practiced. In the foundational work of classicist David

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Anne-Laure Amilhat Szary

going further than bringing back female into the picture; it means going beyond the binary of being in/out and to question the normativity of regional thinking. For that purpose, why not queer regional studies? There are, in fact, very little works that

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Doing Queer Love

Feminism, AIDS, and History

Lisa Diedrich

In this essay, I utilize the concept of the echo, as formulated in the historical and methodological work of Michel Foucault and Joan W. Scott, to help theorize the historical relationship between health feminism and AIDS activism. I trace the echoes between health feminism and AIDS activism in order to present a more complex history of both movements, and to try to think through the ways that the coming together of these two struggles in a particular place and time—New York City in the 1980s—created particular practices that might be effective in other times and places. The practice that I focus on here is one that I call 'doing queer love'. As I hope to show, 'doing queer love' both describes a particular history of health activism and opens up the possibility of bringing into being a different future than the one a conventional history of AIDS seems to predict. It is an historical echo that I believe we must try to hear now, not just in order to challenge a particular history of AIDS activism in the United States, but also in order to provide a model that can be useful for addressing the continuing problem of AIDS across the globe.

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Deborah Kahn-Harris

This article traces the interpretation of Genesis 1:26–28 from the approach of contemporary identity studies over the past fifty years (in honour of the fiftieth anniversary of Bible Week). The article commences with a personal anecdote as a means of demonstrating the link between the biblical text and the lived experience of real people in relation to feminist interpretations. The article continues by detailing examples of academic writing from the following contemporary hermeneutical approaches: feminist, Earth-centred/environmental, queer (LGBTQi+), post-colonial, and indigenous.