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Nimer Sultany, Shulamit Almog, Gad Barzilai, Clara Sabbagh, and Pieter Vanhuysse

The Making of an Underclass: The Palestinian Citizens of Israel Nimer Sultany

Between Citizenship, Equality, and Law: The Language of the Summer 2011 Social Protests Shulamit Almog and Gad Barzilai

How Do Israelis and Germans Assess the Justice of Their Pension System? Clara Sabbagh and Pieter Vanhuysse

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Sabina Stan and Fiona Murphy

Esin Bozkurt (2009), Conceptualising 'Home': The Question of Belonging Among Turkish Families in Germany (Frankfurt/M. and New York: Campus), 243 pp., Pb: €32.90, ISBN: 978-3593387918.

Brigitte Bönisch-Brednich and Catherine Trundle (eds) (2010), Local Lives: Migration and the Politics of Place (Aldershot: Ashgate), 218 pp., Hb: £55.00, ISBN: 978-1-4094-0103-2.

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Performing the Hyphen

Engaging German-Jewishness at the Jewish Museum Berlin

Jackie Feldman and Anja Peleikis

The Jewish Museum Berlin (JMB) is a dynamic, performative space that negotiates between representing the Jew as an integral part of German history and as ultimate Other. While this tension has been documented through the political history of the museum (Lackmann 2000; Pieper 2006; Young 2000), we focus on the dynamics of guided tours and special events. We claim that guiding and festival events at JMB marginalise Holocaust memory and present an image of Jews of the past that promotes a multicultural vision of present-day Germany. In guiding performances, the identity of the guide as German/Jewish/Muslim is part of the guiding performance, even when not made explicit. By comparing tour performances for various publics, and the 'storytelling rights' granted by the group, we witness how visitors' scripts and expectations interact with the museum's mission that it serve as a place of encounter (Ort der Begegnung). As German-Jewish history at JMB serves primarily as a cosmopolitan template for intercultural relations, strongly affiliated local Jews may not feel a need for the museum. Organised groups of Jews from abroad, however, visit it as part of the Holocaust memorial landscape of Berlin, while many local Jews with weaker affiliations to the Jewish community may find it an attractive venue for performing their more fluid Jewish identities – for themselves and for others.

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Learning from Greverus

Pathways towards Another Aesthetic in Anthropology

Judith Laister

The emergence of modern scientific thought has been characterised by a separation from the realm of art. Among others, German anthropologist Ina-Maria Greverus since the 1970s, in the context of the worldwide critique of the discipline’s formats, pioneered new approaches to articulate anthropological work and findings with and through artistic practices.

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Gisela Welz

In the 1970s, scholar Ina-Maria Greverus was a pioneer in opening German Volkskunde towards international horizons. Her concept of human-environment interaction as “territoriality”, inspired by US-american cultural ecology, is reconsidered as an anthropology of the Anthropocene avant la lettre.

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Francisco Martinez

Is fieldwork as anthropologists do it simply a method among others? This article disagrees, drawing on the concept of “serendipity” as introduced by German scholar Ina-Maria Greverus. Beyond the prescribed way of any method, anthropology’s specificity articulates as “discovery”, in this case: an unexpected discovery of remains of the Soviet past in Estonia, through the author’s family life.

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Sicily

An Anthropological Meeting Point

Christian Giordano

On the basis of their shared research and teaching on Sicily since the 1970s, the author contrasts his own Mediterraneanist approach and German scholar Ina-Maria Greverus’ utopian view of the European south as an outstanding experience of an intellectual encounter. Respectful debates of disputatious positions are a rare gift in the academic world of today.

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Nicholas Bayne

The G8 summit meets every year over a weekend in the summer.

It brings together the Presidents of the United States and France;

the Chancellor of Germany; and the Prime Ministers of Japan, the

United Kingdom, Italy and Canada, together with the European

Union (Commission and presidency) and, since 1998, the President

of Russia. Each G8 member acts in turn as summit host while

holding the summit presidency, always in the same order: France,

US, UK, Germany, Japan, Italy and Canada – Russia has not yet

hosted a summit. The G8 has no headquarters or staff of its own,

so all of the responsibility for preparing and holding the summit

falls to the country holding the presidency for the year. That gives

the host country an unusual opportunity to influence the direction

of international economic and political decision making, and most

G8 members use this opportunity to the full.

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The Israeli Diaspora in Berlin

Back to Being Jewish?

Larissa Remennick

In this ethnographic essay, I reflect on the origins and present condition of the new (post-2010) Israeli diaspora in Berlin. Based on 10 months of participant observation, I map out the main sub-streams of this emigration; elicit the economic, professional, and political reasons for leaving Israel; and explore these émigrés’ initial encounter with German society. My observations suggest that many Israeli residents of Berlin (mostly secular) rediscover their Jewishness along diasporic lines and forge ties with the local religious and community organizations. Being a small minority in the German-speaking milieu, Israelis invest in building their own Hebrew-based community networks, including media outlets and cultural and educational institutions. Lastly, I explore these émigrés’ ties with Israel and conclude that many Israelis in Berlin are sojourners rather than immigrants and that Berlin is but one phase in their life journey.

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Karolina Koziura and Jonathan Roper

Mariusz Filip (2012), Od Kaszubów do Niemców: Tożsamość Słowińców z perspektywy antropologii historii [From Kashubians to Germans: Slovicians’ Identity from the Anthropological-Historical Perspective] (Poznań: Wydawnictwo Nauka i Innowacje), 238pp., Pb: PLN40/€10, ISBN: 978-83-63795-09-2.

Venla Sykäri (2011), Words as Events: Cretan Mantinádes in Performance and Composition: Studia Fennica Folkloristica 18 (Helsinki: Finnish Literature Society), 234 pp., Pb: EUR29.00, ISBN: 978-952-222-261-9.