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Introduction

Narratives, Ontologies, Entanglements, and Iconoclasms

Sondra L. Hausner, Simon Coleman, and Ruy Llera Blanes

personal history as the basis from which she learned to observe, research, and write about religion. The articles section features detailed discussions about multiple parts of the world, from Melanesia to China and back to India, in addition to revisiting

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Eleanor Sterling, Tamara Ticktin, Tē Kipa Kepa Morgan, Georgina Cullman, Diana Alvira, Pelika Andrade, Nadia Bergamini, Erin Betley, Kate Burrows, Sophie Caillon, Joachim Claudet, Rachel Dacks, Pablo Eyzaguirre, Chris Filardi, Nadav Gazit, Christian Giardina, Stacy Jupiter, Kealohanuiopuna Kinney, Joe McCarter, Manuel Mejia, Kanoe Morishige, Jennifer Newell, Lihla Noori, John Parks, Pua’ala Pascua, Ashwin Ravikumar, Jamie Tanguay, Amanda Sigouin, Tina Stege, Mark Stege, and Alaka Wali

” communities that addresses the complexity of human-environment interactions. Melanesian Well-Being Indicators: A Biocultural Approach Jamie Tanguay The Melanesian Well-Being Indicators were developed in Vanuatu and designed for relevance across Melanesia, with

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Judith Bovensiepen

fascination with the diverse range of phenomena (mainly in Melanesia) labeled falsely or not as “cargo cults” had already peaked and waned. After an initial proliferation of writing on the subject in the 1950s and 1960s (and resurgences in the 1970s and 1980s

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The Possibilities of Failure

Personhood and Cognitive Disability in Urban Uganda

Tyler Zoanni

dividual’, and Roy Wagner (1991) the ‘fractal person’. Across differences of terminology and emphasis, what discussions of personhood in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Melanesia share is a focus on contexts where social relations are seen as prior to

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Making Friends of the Nations

Australian Interwar Magazines and Middlebrow Orientalism in the Pacific

Victoria Kuttainen and Sarah Galletly

” (1). In the interwar period, as Australia took up a sub-imperial role in Melanesia; as public debate underscored an increasing awareness of Britain’s inadequacy in providing naval defense in the region; and as passenger liner traffic massified across

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Reflections on Cosmopolitan

Politesse with Perspectives from Papua New Guinea

Eric Hirsch

individuality then a great deal of ethnography supports the idea of never being able to know the mind (individuality?) of another (see Robbins and Rumsey 2008 ). For this reason, much social interaction in Melanesia, for example, is influenced by uncertainty

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Freeing the ‘Aboriginal Individual’

Deconstructing ‘Development as Freedom’ in Remote Indigenous Australia

Hannah Bulloch and William Fogarty

but also how we conceive of ourselves and others, in particular, the boundaries and interconnections between one another and between ourselves and the wider cosmos. Early anthropological theorizing compared peoples in South Asia, Melanesia, and Africa

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The Worth of the ‘While’

Time and Taxes in a Finnish Timebank

Matti Eräsaari

–42) has argued that in Melanesia hierarchy can be realized in terms of the dominant value of equality: a ‘big-man’ status is achieved by having more equal-exchange partners than others, by being quantitatively more equal than others. Similarly, Helsinki

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Rane Willerslev

‘ethnographic orthodoxy’ through its concern for uncovering the radical alterity of others ( Willerslev 2013c: 42 ). This radical alterity is supposed to be found primarily in small-scale communities in Amazonia ( Viveiros de Castro 1992 ), Melanesia ( Scott

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Introduction

Toward a Comparative Anthropology of Muslim and Christian Lived Religion

Daan Beekers

: University of California Press . Robbins , Joel , Bambi B. Schieffelin , and Aparecida Vilaça . 2014 . “ Evangelical Conversion and the Transformation of the Self in Amazonia and Melanesia: Christianity and the Revival of Anthropological Comparison