Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 30 items for :

  • "TECHNOLOGY" x
  • Religious Studies x
  • Anthropology x
  • Peace and Conflict Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Stacy M. K. George

.” Perspectives on Global Development and Technology 10 ( 1 ): 11 - 29 . 10.1163/156914911X555071 Blee , Kathleen M. , and Kimberly A. Creasap . 2010 . “ Conservative and Right-Wing Movements .” Annual Review of Sociology 36 : 269 - 286 . 10

Restricted access

Jack Hunter, Annelin Eriksen, Jon Mitchell, Mattijs van de Port, Magnus Course, Nicolás Panotto, Ruth Barcan, David M. R. Orr, Girish Daswani, Piergiorgio Di Giminiani, Pirjo Kristiina Virtanen, Sofía Ugarte, Ryan J. Cook, Bettina E. Schmidt, and Mylene Mizrahi

intentional nature of the idea of sacralization. For many contributors to this collection, enchantment is a technology capable of instituting the necessary conditions for intersubjective relations with non-humans. McWilliams, for instance, in debunking the

Restricted access

Bülent Diken

’ (religious faith) and the ‘machine’ (capitalist technoscience). In order to protect itself, to immunize itself, religion seeks to reject capitalism and technology. The paradox, however, is that while reacting antagonistically to capitalist technoscience

Restricted access

The Uncanniness of Missionary Others

A Discursive Analysis of a Century of Anthropological Writings on Missionary Ethnographers

Travis Warren Cooper

them as introducing invasive new media technologies ( Lewis 1997: 349 ). Discourse Four: The Missionary as Data A fourth and determined discursive pattern proceeds out of and relates to “Discourse One: The Missionary as Anthropological Foil.” This

Restricted access

Pentecostalism and Egalitarianism in Melanesia

A Reconsideration of the Pentecostal Gender Paradox

Annelin Eriksen

precisely, how the discourse on sex became a technology of power. Foucault’s analysis of European developments is interesting not only in the context of Melanesia and the processes of interiorization I have pointed to, but also because his analyses reveal an

Restricted access

The Religious Foundations of Capoeira Angola

The Cosmopolitics of an Apparently Non-religious Practice

Sergio González Varela

. New York : Basic Books . Goldman , Marcio . 2005 . “ Formas do Saber e Modos do Ser: Observações Sobre Multiplicidade e Ontologia no Candomblé .” Religião e Sociedade 25 ( 2 ): 102 – 121 . Graham , Richard . 1991 . “ Technology and Culture

Restricted access

Around Abby Day’s Believing in Belonging

Belief and Social Identity in the Modern World

Christopher R. Cotter, Grace Davie, James A. Beckford, Saliha Chattoo, Mia Lövheim, Manuel A. Vásquez, and Abby Day

-temples, or small tightly packed storefront churches carving out their livelihood in the sinful city, or a grotto with healing waters. Performative belief is dependent on technology and the media, which often intensify the physical experience and allow its

Free access

Introduction

Legacies, Trajectories, and Comparison in the Anthropology of Buddhism

Nicolas Sihlé and Patrice Ladwig

, Technology and Civilization , ed. Nathan Schlanger , 57 – 74 . New York : Berghahn Books . McDaniel , Justin . 2011 . The Lovelorn Ghost and the Magical Monk: Practicing Buddhism in Modern Thailand . New York : Columbia University Press . McMahan

Restricted access

Portrait

Ann Grodzins Gold

Ann Grodzins Gold, Bhrigupati Singh, Farhana Ibrahim, Edward Simpson, and Kirin Narayan

distinctive capacity to trace religion in motion—reframed within life circumstances, shifting aesthetics, and the forces of the media, technology, economic liberalization, and globalization. Collaboratively Produced Knowledge An openness to others’ guidance

Restricted access

Portrait

J. D. Y. Peel

Marloes Janson, Wale Adebanwi, David Pratten, Ruth Marshall, Stephan Palmié, Amanda Villepastour, and J. D. Y. Peel

Edited by Richard Fardon and Ramon Sarró

culinary flair, he had a knack for putting people together. On one particularly memorable occasion, our animated exchanges organically bounced around the table; one minute we were on Yoruba language computer technology, and the next on surrogate speech in