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Jewish Secular-Believer Women in Israel

A Complex and Ambivalent Identity

Hagar Lahav

by candle lighting. Some women restrict their activities, avoiding work or cooking, unnecessary travel, shopping, or Internet surfing. Other Halakhic prohibitions, however, such as driving a car or using electricity, are largely ignored. Like the

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Yuval Gozansky

Israel? Not quite. One giant global change that influenced the local field of children’s television in Israel was the rise of digital media, which began in the late 2000s and expanded dramatically in the 2010s. The improved speed of Internet flow that led

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Family on the Edge

Neblagopoluchnaia Family and the State in Yakutsk and Magadan, Russian Federation

Lena Sidorova and Elena Khlinovskaya Rockhill

, communication (Internet), transport, leisure activities and city comforts (e.g., central heating, tap water supply and bathroom facilities). With the increasing number of village dwellers moving into the city, a division between city and village became more

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Migrations West to East in the Times of the Ottoman Empire

The Example of a Gypsy/Roma Group in Modern Iran

Elena Marushiakova and Vesselin Popov

This article presents the community of the Romanies/Gypsies called the Zargar, who live in contemporary Iran. For centuries the Zargar had not been aware of the existence of other Gypsies. Only nowadays, with the means of modern telecommunications, including the Internet, have representatives of the Zargar 'discovered' that there are other Roma in the world, and they have begun looking for their place within the international Romani community. Lacking a clear memory of their own past, the Zargar are trying to construct such a history and an extended identity, while establishing contact with their 'kin' in Europe.

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Adriana Zaharijević, Kristen Ghodsee, Efi Kanner, Árpád von Klimó, Matthew Stibbe, Tatiana Zhurzhenko, Žarka Svirčev, Agata Ignaciuk, Sophia Kuhnle, Ana Miškovska Kajevska, Chiara Bonfiglioli, Marina Hughson, Sanja Petrović Todosijević, Enriketa Papa-Pandelejmoni, Stanislava Barać, Ayşe Durakbaşa, Selin Çağatay, and Agnieszka Mrozik

. Agnieszka Kościańska, Zobaczyć łosia: Historia polskiej edukacji seksualnej od pierwszej lekcji do internetu (To see a moose: The history of Polish sex education from the first lesson to the internet), Wołowiec: Czarne, 2017, 424 pp., PLN 44.90 (hardback

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Massimo Florio

During 2006, Telecom Italia—the most important of Italy’s entirely privatized

companies and one of the largest in the country in terms of market

capitalization, profit, employment, and technological wealth—ran into

political controversy. On 11 September, CEO Marco Tronchetti Provera

presented the company’s board with a strategic plan that, breaking with

the course followed the previous year, foresaw the unbundling of three

divisions: Telecom Italia (TI, landline telephone services, Internet, and

media operations), Telecom Italia Mobile (TIM, mobile telephone services),

and Telecom Italia Rete (the network operator). In the days following

the announcement, the government claimed that it had been kept

in the dark about the proposal despite a series of meetings with the TI

board. The press nevertheless revealed that one of Romano Prodi’s advisers

had sent Tronchetti an alternative plan that would have allowed the

purchase of the landline network by the Cassa Depositi e Prestiti (Deposit

and Loans Fund), a holding group controlled by the Ministry of Finance.

Prodi denied any knowledge of this plan in Parliament (his adviser subsequently

resigned).

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Conflicts in Children’s Everyday Lives

Fresh Perspectives on Protracted Crisis in Lebanon

Erik van Ommering

to the roads, in the rivers, in the mountains. We can’t even swim in the sea because of the garbage!’ ‘Wars,’ Mahmoud adds. ‘Electricity cuts.’ ‘Water cuts.’ ‘Internet cuts.’ ‘Telephone cuts.’ Julia looks at me and sighs. ‘Mr Erik, so now you know why

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Farideh Pourgiv

narrative voice is also female. This is one of the first Iranian novels in which weblogs are mentioned and which shows how the younger generation is using the Internet. The generation gap is particularly evident here as Mahmonir does not know what a chat

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Ioana Cîrstocea

and internet tutoring to their members. The trainers recall that some of the beneficiaries of the program started at the level of “how to switch the computer on, how to use the mouse.” 46 Women newly connected to the internet emailed the NEWW office

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Every Dog Has Its Day

New Patterns in Pet Keeping in Iran

Anahita Grisoni and Marjan Mashkour

incited the interviewer to compare this process to the purchase of a computer or a telephone on the Internet. In this regard, the surveyor explains: ‘What is interesting here is that they said that they were happy to see that this search on the Internet