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The Living Land

Ecological Ethics of the Evenks and Evens

Anna Sirina

This article investigates people's relationships to the natural environment, or ecological ethics, in two closely related minority ethnic groups—Evenki and Eveny in Siberia. It is based on the oral histories and the experience of people living "traditionally" on the land, and also those who have settled permanently in villages and towns. The article explains what role nature plays in their lives, the cultural rules of interrelation with it, and their transformations in the contemporary world. Indigenous moral laws have not been able to protect the land and nature from destruction common in wider Russian society. Therefore, appropriate state policy is needed to protect the rights of the minority indigenous peoples of the Russian North for use of natural resources.

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The Montreal Moroccan Diaspora

History, Memories and Identities

Henry Green

Canada’s Moroccan Jewish community is the third largest diaspora in the world after Israel and France. This article introduces Sephardi Voices, a project to collect, preserve and archive audio-visually the life stories of Jews displaced from Arab/Islamic lands and in the process sketches an overview of the resettlement of one Sephardi migration community, the Moroccan to Montreal. Featuring scholars like Joseph Levy, Yolande Cohen and Jean-Claude Lasry, the integration experience of Moroccan Jews into the anglophone Ashkenazi community and the francophone Québécois society is presented, along with their efforts to build a French-Sephardi institutional structure to preserve their heritage. The article highlights the role of oral history and the aesthetics of remembrance as important vehicles to depict how memories are imparted and identities formed. Today, the Moroccan Jews of Montreal are transnationals and proud to add Canadian to their identity chain of Jewish, Sephardi, Moroccan and French.

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Barbara Klich-Kluczewska, Gabriela Dudeková, Philip Mann, Kristen Ghodsee, Susan Zimmermann, Barbara Alpern Engel, Rhonda Semple, Amelia Licheva, Christian Promitzer, and Oksana Kis

Women, Communism, and Industrialization in Postwar Poland by Małgorzata Fidelis Barbara Klich-Kluczewska

The Politics of Gender Culture under State Socialism: An Expropriated Voice by Hana Havelková and Libora Oates-Indruchová (eds.) Gabriela Dudeková

Gendered Artistic Positions and Social Voices: Politics, Cinema, and the Visual Arts in State-Socialist and Post-Socialist Hungary by Beata Hock Philip Mann

Staging Socialist Femininity: Gender Politics and Folklore Performance in Serbia by Ana Hofman Kristen Ghodsee

Kohle für Stalin und Hitler: Arbeiten und Leben im Donbass 1929 bis 1953 (Coal for Stalin and Hitler. Working and living in the Donets basin 1929 to 1953) by Tanja Penter Susan Zimmermann

Bytovoe nasilie v istorii rossiiskoi povsednevnosti (XI–XXI vv.) (Domestic violence in the history of Russian everyday life [XI–XXI vv.]) by Marianna G. Muravyeva and Natalia L. Pushkareva, (eds.) Barbara Alpern Engel

Domestic Frontiers: Gender, Reform, and American Interventions in the Ottoman Balkans and the Near East, 1831–1908 by Barbara Reeves-Ellington Rhoda Semple

Zhenite v modernostta (Women in modernity) by Reneta Roshkeva and Nikolai Nenov (eds.) Amelia Licheva

Physical Anthropology, Race and Eugenics in Greece (1880s–1970s) by Sevasti Trubeta Christian Promitzer

Nezvychaini doli zvychainykh zhinok: Usna istoria XX stolittia (The extraordinary lives of ordinary women: Oral history of the twentieth century) by Iroida Wynnytsky (ed.) Oksana Kis

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Constructing the Socialist Worker

Gender, Identity and Work under State Socialism in Braşov, Romania

Jill Massino

Utilising socialist legislation, propaganda and oral history interviews, this article analyses how women’s identities and roles – as well as gender relations – were reformulated as a result of women’s participation in paid labour in socialist Romania. Although some women regarded work as burdensome and unsatisfying, others found it intellectually fulfilling, personally rewarding and, in certain respects, empowering. For example, work improved women’s economic position and offered them an array of social services, which, although inadequate in a number of ways, were welcomed by many women. Moreover, work increased women’s physical and social mobility, which in turn provided them with greater freedom in directing their own lives and in choosing a partner. Finally, the experience of being harassed by male co-workers and of combining work outside the home with domestic responsibilities motivated some women to rethink their status both within the workplace and the family, and to renegotiate their relationships with male colleagues and partners. Although women never achieved full equality in socialist Romania, by creating the conditions for women’s full-time engagement in the workforce, state socialism decisively shaped the course of women’s lives, their self-identities and their conceptions of gender roles, often in positive ways.

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Ayse Durakbasa, Raluca Maria Popa, Ralitsa Muharska, Nadya Radulova, and Krassimira Daskalova

Serpil Çakır, Osmanlı Kadın Hareketi [The Ottoman women’s movement], Istanbul: Metis, 1994, second edition 1996; 350 pp. (pb) 13,20 YTL. ISBN: 975-342-044-7

Krassimira Daskalova ed., Voices of Their Own. Oral History Interviews of Women, trans. Ralitsa Muharska and Elitsa Stoitsova, Sofia: Polis Publishers, 2004, 207 pp. (pb). ISBN 954-796-008-3

Kristen Ghodsee, Red Riviera: Gender, Tourism, and Postsocialism on the Black Sea, Duke University Press, Durham and London, 2005, 174 pp., 2 appendices, $74.95 (cloth). ISBN cloth 0-8223-3650-2; $21.95 (pb). ISBN 0-8223-3662-6

Irina Novikova and Dimitar Kambourov, eds., Men in the Global World: Integrating Post-Socialist Perspectives, Helsinki: Kikimora Publications, 2003, 250 pp. (pb). ISBN 952-10-1308-7

Olga Todorova, Zhenite ot tsentralnite Balkani prez osmanskata epoha (XV–XVII vek). (Women of the Central Balkans during the early centuries of Ottoman Rule [fifteenth-seventeenth Centuries]). Sofia: Gutenberg, 2004, 515 pp., 12 BGL (pb). ISBN954-9943-85-2

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Maria Bucur, Rayna Gavrilova, Wendy Goldman, Maureen Healy, Kate Lebow, and Mark Pittaway

It is not the first time a journal is attempting a livelier format of intellectual exchange among academic specialists in the history of Russia/the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. But it is the first time that specialists working on questions of gender in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe are coming together to discuss a theme, theory and methodology issue together in this fashion, across a vast area and a very rich and differentiated scholarship. My interest in generating this dialogue is connected to my graduate training in the early 1990s, which came at a point when the social history of Eastern Europe was starting to gain new dimensions, linked to oral history and to the evanescent everyday life field that was gaining an important foothold at that time through the work of Alf Lüdtke and a group of social historians and historical sociologists working at University of Michigan and a few other institutions at that time. I was also becoming interested in gender as a category of historical analysis and found the Alltagsgeschichte approach embraced by this group of scholars particularly conducive to making gender topics visible and relevant in historical research and writing.

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Tero Mustonen, Sergei V. Sokolovskiy, Hugh Beach, and Jessica Kantarovich

, Sweden Oral History Meets Linguistics Edited by Erich Kasten, Katja Roller, and Joshua Wilbur (Fürstenberg/Havel, Germany: Kulturstiftung Sibirien, 2017), 211 pp., 12 color photos. €26.00 (paperback). ISBN 978-3-942883-30-6 Oral history and linguistics

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Sharon A. Kowalsky

themselves within their social milieus through their dress. Drawing material from oral histories, Sitar highlights the fluidity of social class in socialist Slovenia as women negotiated, defined, and challenged ideas about social status. Slovenia's proximity

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Online Documents of India’s Past

Digital Archives and Memory Production

Katja Müller

Historian has been taught basic etiquette and procedures for conducting oral history interviews, as well as basic video recording techniques. Everyone with Internet access can partake in the webinars; most Citizen Historians come from India or Pakistan and

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and localities, for example, and new methods, including quantitative and oral history. Keywords : Algeria, colonization, labor, migration, social hierarchies, social history Annick Lacroix , Au contact: Postiers non-citoyens dans l’Algérie colonisée