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Lowry Martin

important cultural commentary and serve as “public pedagogy and a form of cultural politics” (Giroux 2004: 122). Instead, these films offer alternative subject positions, they make visible and mobilize desires, they influence us unconsciously, and they help

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Heta Mulari

understand the metro as an urban space in which the material and the political are deeply intertwined. The research data includes interviews with 16- to 17-year-old girls and non-binary young people, conducted in eastern and central Helsinki in June 2016 and

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Chloe Krystyna Garcia and Ayesha Vemuri

is little academic research to investigate the transformative roles of YouTube in terms of its pedagogical as well as political potentials” (2010: 7). In this article, we respond to this gap by analyzing the main themes in 10 videos about rape culture

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“I Am Trying” to Perform Like an Ideal Boy

The Construction of Boyhood through Corporal Punishment and Educational Discipline in Taare Zameen Par

Natasha Anand

that on the one hand, reflects how dominant social, cultural, and political dogmas restrict gendered identities, yet on the other, acts also as a site of struggle, resistance and contest effectively reshaping, transforming and empowering such

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“The Dragon Can't Roar”

Analysis of British Expatriate Masculinity in Yusuf Dawood's One Life Too Many

Antony Mukasa Mate

main protagonist. Walker takes advantage of the British colonial domination and sojourns around several colonies under the Empire before settling in Kenya. There, Walker is immediately absorbed by the minority but economic and politically dominant

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Caroline Caron

This article addresses the invisibility of teenage girls within and outside of feminist theory and citizenship studies from the perspective of girlhood studies. Most often addressed as individuals in need of protection, girls and adolescent females are seldom considered political citizen-subjects. In addition, because they do not fit within existing frameworks of analysis, some of their citizenship practices, including mediamaking, are not acknowledged as forms of political agentivity or political participation. Drawing on my past and current research with Francophone teenage girls in Canada, I highlight and problematize this denial in a way that underlines the need for girlhood studies to politicize its vocabulary so that teenage girls can become part of us rather than women-to-become in feminist citizenship studies and others areas of inquiry in which youth citizenship is being re-theorized. I argue that such politicization broadens what girls' health entails to include their political healthiness.

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The Girl in the Mirror

The Psychic Economy of Class in the Discourse of Girlhood Studies

Valerie Hey

This article questions Angela McRobbie's recent text The Aftermath of Feminism: Gender, Culture and Social Change because it creates some interesting new vocabulary for understanding late modernity's revised sexual and cultural politics. Whilst acknowledging the sophistication of its cultural studies-inspired argument, I consider some consequences of this reading. If theory also performs as a politics of representation, I ask what happens if, in accounting for post-feminism, the theoretical status of class as an antagonistic relation is diminished. I suggest what gender and education discourses can add to a reading of 'new times'.

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Raperas of the NeoRevolución

young women, capitalism and Cuban hip hop culture

Ardath Whynacht

This article explores female representation in mainstream hip hop culture in Cuba as a case study for analyzing how the presence of a commercial recording industry affects girls' participation as artists at the community level. The author raises questions about the role of a commercial recording industry, within a neoliberal political culture, in skewing youth culture from its underground roots, and about how young women navigate and resist such challenges in order to participate in hip hop culture.

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Jonathan A. Allan

Crises of masculinity and wars on boys often deploy the suicides of young males as a rhetorical strategy in raising awareness for a political cause, that is to say a declaration of war, a war that remains dubious at best. Who, for instance, declared “war” on “boys”? This paper argues that theorists of gender, particularly masculinity, must think carefully and critically about suicide as a rhetorical strategy. In particular, this paper seeks to explain why men’s rights activists and scholars prefer the term “boys” to “young men” or “adolescents,” and subsequently aims to work through ideas of temporality, futurity, and slow death to understand the deployment of suicide as strategy.

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Claudia Mitchell

There is something rebellious about the work of Girlhood Studies so it is perhaps fitting that “Visual Disruptions” is the theme of this seventeenth issue of Girlhood Studies. The significance of 17 as an age in the life of girls and young women may vary, of course, across cultures, and, indeed, within contemporary popular culture in the West it is not necessarily seen as disruptive, as research on Seventeen magazine highlights. Nonetheless, we can think of the Janis Ian song from the 1970s, “At Seventeen,” and the many songs from The Beatles to the Sex Pistols that refer to girls being 17, and contemplate a state that is far from compliant in relation to conventional femininity. The articles in this themed issue of Girlhood Studies, guest-edited by Danai S. Mupotsa and Elina Oinas, offer a fascinating investigation into the politics of girlhood and visual culture, and the politics of disruption itself. The contributions are also a testament to the close alliance between feminism and visual studies.