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Kelli Ann Malone

The current list of books for review includes some of the most exciting new books in applied anthropology to be published this year. Please take a close look and if there is anything that you particularly want to review, let us know!

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Michaela Benson

The current list of books for review includes some of the most exciting new books in applied anthropology to be published this year. Please take a close look and if there is anything that you particularly want to review, let us know!

Free access

Michaela Benson

The current list of books for review includes some of the most exciting new books in applied anthropology to be published this year. Please take a close look and if there is anything that you particularly want to review, let us know!

Free access

Michaela Benson

The current list of books for review includes some of the most exciting new books in applied anthropology to be published this year. Please take a close look and if there is anything that you particularly want to review, let us know!

Free access

Michaela Benson

The current list of books for review includes some of the most exciting new books in applied anthropology to be published this year. Please take a close look and if there is anything that you particularly want to review, let us know!

Free access

Kelli Ann Malone

The current list of books for review includes some of the most exciting new books in applied anthropology to be published this year. Please take a close look and if there is anything that you particularly want to review, let us know!

Free access

Kelli Ann Malone

The current list of books for review includes some of the most exciting new books in applied anthropology to be published this year. Please take a close look and if there is anything that you particularly want to review, let us know!

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Jonathan Skinner

In this special issue of Anthropology in Action, applied anthropology colleagues from Durham University—one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK—come together to feature some of their recent research. Anthropology at Durham University is well known for its applied strain. And here, guest editor Paul Sillitoe, Professor of Anthropology at Durham, showcases some of the indigenous knowledge (IK) research projects emanating from Durham as part of their Anthropology in Development programme.

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Jonathan Skinner

I am pleased to present five articles in this special issue of Anthropology in Action. They show a lively, challenging and engaged set of interventions that cross social and applied anthropology boundaries, doing so through combined arts health practices. That many of them take place in Northern Ireland and are propelled by anthropology graduates is an additional boon to a challenging and economically deprived part of the U.K. Three – Raw, McCaffery, Zeindlinger – were originally presented at the Arts Care 21st anniversary conference held in Belfast, ‘Sustainable Creativity in Healthcare’, May 2012. They represent work by publicly engaged anthropologists, a number living, working and practising in Northern Ireland. Other presenters from the conference could not join us but were also anthropologists practising anthropo - anthropologically informed community-relations work in Northern Ireland on deprived and segregated estates(Emma Graham) and in creative dance choreography with special needs and third-age performers (Lauren Guyer). Not so ‘half-baked’ applied anthropology, to challenge Lucy Mair’s (1969: 8) original castigation of such intervention work.

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Eric B. Ross and David H. Price

It has long been acknowledged that the Second World War significantly transformed anthropology and gave rise to applied anthropology as a professional subdiscipline; but, there has been surprisingly little scholarly inquiry into the particulars of this process, during the war or as it gave way to the Cold War. The relative silence, among anthropologists, regarding the contributions of their colleagues to the interests of government during this crucial period, is itself worthy of study. Though it might simply be regarded as a subject whose time has not yet come, whose subject matter has little immediate relevance to the intellectual priorities of our own time, even a tentative excursion into the subject suggests that there are uncomfortable issues just below the surface, issues that reflect ethical and political contradictions that anthropologists must inevitably confront.