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Temperature and Capital

Measuring the Future with Quantified Heat

Scott W. Schwartz

My iPhone tells me the temperature this Saturday will be 99°F. Is this appliance of mine making a benign assertion about sensible heat, or reifying the hypothetical future of capital by suppressing uncertainty? Both, perhaps, but the latter is far

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Emily Bent

ongoing challenges related to expanding girls’ political capital and influencing global policymakers while we are all laboring under neoliberal narratives of exceptional girl power. Girl activism networks today must balance promoting “girls’ agency as

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H.S. Hundley

The location of the capital of the Mongolian Empire, Kharakorum, had been lost to outsiders for centuries. In the summer of 1889, Nicholas Mikhailovich Iadrintsev, author, editor, and publisher of the newspaper Vostochnoe Obozrenie went in search of Kharakorum. As an oblastnik, Iadrintsev went on this quest to further understanding of Inner Asia's history. He quickly discovered its location in the Orkhon Valley, and the extremely significant Kultigin Stones, the first known Turkish writing of the first Turkish state. Iadrintsev's role in these discoveries and subsequent activity, are the subject of this research report.

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Constructing a Public Sphere

Materiality and Ideology

Judith Kapferer

The changing cultural and social significance of central city space generates and structures the social formations of capital today. Buildings and landmarks within the city of London are examined here as crucibles for the expression, symbolization, formation, and re-formation of the social orders of the city and the state. Here, the cultural power of state apparatuses to control and order the image and substance of capital and state is challenged by the arts of architecture and cityscape. The relation between public space and private practice is interrogated in locations such as the Square Mile, Trafalgar Square, and Hyde Park, which symbolize and concretize the social relations of the marketplace, the state, and the people. The experience of these places is iconic of the social formations of contemporary society.

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Clarifying Liquidity

Keynes and Marx, Merchants, and Poets

Rolf Hugoson

. Second, maintaining an interest in capital, we move over to the conceptual history of financial liquidity, including, third, giving a short overview of how money came to flow, and fourth, taking the economist John Maynard Keynes's more theoretical

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Whitewashing History

Pinker’s (Mis)Representation of the Enlightenment and Violence

Philip Dwyer

likes to make bold statements. The Enlightenment led to: the elimination of capital and corporal punishments; a severe curtailment of govern- ment violence against “subjects”; the abolition of slavery (by which he means the abolition of the Atlantic

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The Decline of Rome

The Never-Ending Crisis in the Capital

Giada Zampano

The first female mayor in Rome’s history, Virginia Raggi, is faced with a dual challenge. First, she must try to solve the chronic problems of a city mired in debt and struggling with an ongoing emergency caused by chronic traffic problems and chaotic waste disposal. Then the young mayor must experiment with new ways of exercising power to establish the transparency required to restore the reputation of a political class that has led Rome to become known as the “Mafia Capital,” with its own “in-between world” made up of corrupt politicians, business people, and criminals. Since assuming office, Raggi has faced a political impasse, and her administration has suffered an embarrassing string of resignations and judicial scandals that have brought into question the city’s future prospects. Rome is now at a crossroads that may lead to either a much-awaited renaissance or a definitive meltdown.

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Sandra S. Butler and Adrienne L. Cohen

This article presents two independent studies examining the experiences of older adults aging in rural environments in the United States. In face-to-face interviews, study participants (n = 66 in study 1 and n = 8 in study 2) were asked what they like about aging in a rural area and what they found challenging. Interview transcripts were analyzed for recurring themes in each study and striking similarities were found with regard to the importance of nature or “aesthetic capital” to the well-being of the study participants. Primary themes emerging from study 1 data included peace, safety, beauty, space, and interacting with nature. The themes emerging from the second study included the world outside the window, traveling around by car, and longing for natural beauty. A negative theme that emerged from both studies related to the dearth of health and social services in rural areas. Implications of the studies' findings with regard to the value of nature in the lives of elders are discussed in relation to practice, policy, and planning.

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Social Lives and Symbolic Capital

Indigenous ‘Oil Lawsuits’ as Sites of Order and Disorder Making

Veronica Davidov

can be conceptualized as the ‘social lives’ of lawsuits that go beyond the demarcated formal contours of juridical settings—how they circulate, what kind of symbolic capital they accrue that may last long after the litigations are over, what narratives

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Istvan Adorjan

David Harvey, A brief history of neoliberalism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005, 247 pp., 0-19928-327-3 (paperback).

Patrick Bond, Against the global apartheid: South Africa meets the World Bank, IMF and international finance. 2nd ed. London and New York: Zed Books, 2003. 326 pp, 1-84277-393-3 (paperback).