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Abin Chakraborty

remarkable evidence of cultural mobility during the Renaissance that often contradicts orientalist stereotypes of a latter era by creating fluid spaces of self-fashioning. Despite Coryat’s occasional assertions about the greatness of England and the

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Terms of Silence

Weaknesses in Corporate and Law Enforcement Responses to Cyberviolence against Girls

Suzanne Dunn, Julie S. Lalonde, and Jane Bailey

2015 ). When girls either assert their rights or express themselves outside the bounds of stereotypically white heterosexual femininity online ( Regan and Sweet 2015 ), their expression is often policed by other users ( Senft and Baym 2015 ; Steeves

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Deproblematizing The Merchant of Venice

Text, and Pretexts for Changing Subtext

Roger Wooster

antisemitic riots inspired by the Lopez treason plot of 1594. Fiedler posits that Shakespeare was encouraged by public opinion to create Shylock in Merchant ‘against … his own deepest instincts’. 8 He argues that the play embodies ‘stereotypes and myths

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Ka-Kin Cheuk

despite the Indians’ image of untrustworthiness, and the perception that dealing with them requires a great investment of time and effort, there are many Chinese suppliers willing to do business with them. Negative stereotypes of traders who do business in

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The Medium Is the Message

Olivier Schrauwen’s Arsène Schrauwen beyond Expectations of Autobiography, Colonial History and the Graphic Novel

Benoît Crucifix and Gert Meesters

intentionally expressing racism, Sleen drew nonwhite races very stereotypically. 80 As explained above, Arsène Schrauwen hardly ever shows black people, but Arsène is very uneasy about them. Just like Suske en Wiske, Nero always mixed adventure and humour

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“Racism Is Not An Opinion”

Muslim Responses to Pegida and Islamophobia in Germany

Karolin Machtans

what one seeks to combat: namely, the stereotype of a monolithic and static entity that Muslims in Germany do not in fact represent. Moreover, the perceived need to speak with one voice might silence necessary debates among the different Islamic

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Groped and Gutted

Hollywood's Hegemonic Reimagining of Counterculture

Samantha Eddy

-Guzman (2016) terms this the “Hollywood Paradox”: seemingly, Hollywood emerges as a subject of diversification in mainstream media and yet the mechanisms of legitimate diversification—beyond tokenizing or stereotyping—are actively blockaded by Hollywood

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Penny Harvey

• What is the status of anthropology in Britain? • What does the general non-academic public know about anthropology? • What is the ‘stereotype’ of the anthropologist? • Does anthropological knowledge travel beyond academia to broader publics? • What is the status of anthropology within the University?

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Joshua Grace

Mobility is often mentioned in African history, but rarely is it examined to its full analytical potential. This is unfortunate, in part because in the 1960s the first generation of African historians considered cultures of mobility a means of challenging stereotypes of African backwardness and simplicity. Jan Vansina, for example, used mobility to uncover “complexity” and “efficiency” in African political history—a stated goal of early Africanist historians working to debunk colonial stereotypes—and to challenge the structural-functionalist lens through which colonials and outsiders had understood African identities and social systems. In the following decades, mobility was critical to several aspects of African history—including slavery, women’s history, labor migration, and urbanization. Yet the makings of a recognizable field of African mobility have not emerged until recently.

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'Heritage Anti-Semitism' in Modern Times?

Representations of Jews and Judaism in Twenty-First-Century British Historical Fiction for Children

Madelyn Travis

Beginning in the 1960s, British children's literature began to include sympathetic representations of people from outside the dominant culture. Greater numbers of Jewish characters appeared as part of this trend. In the succeeding decades, the British publishing industry has continued to encourage cultural sensitivity in children's books, but this article argues that, despite this, in the twenty-first century constructions of Jews and Judaism increasingly resemble the stereotypical images common in works from previous eras. The paper goes on to contend that although these stereotypes were acknowledged and challenged in historical fiction for children of the 1960s and 1970s in order to promote tolerance, authorial intent in employing such images in more recent historical novels is often unclear, and as a result the texts convey ambivalent messages to today's young readers about the place of Jews in British society.