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Eugene N. Anderson, Jodie Asselin, Jessica diCarlo, Ritwick Ghosh, Michelle Hak Hepburn, Allison Koch, and Lindsay Vogt

qualities of the wetland—notably its wildlife and its rice agriculture. She is also aware of needs for economic development. She places her work in a context of European efforts to save heritage farming systems as part of national parks. Her book is an

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Zoe Bray and Christian Thauer

, constituted by human interaction, and have, at a minimum, three dimensions: a functional (for example, a certain issue area or problem), historical (political spaces may open at one time and close at another), and territorial (in the sense of local, national

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Andrew McCumber

relationship to nature and the environment. California’s drought was already a national news item on May 5, 2015, when Santa Barbara declared a Stage 3 drought 1 ( Welsh 2015 ), and the dry conditions have persisted since. I will argue that drought conditions

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Mino-Mnaamodzawin

Achieving Indigenous Environmental Justice in Canada

Deborah McGregor

citizens in the state. This was certainly not the first time hazardous waste deposits had been intentionally situated in close proximity to people of color and the poor, but the Warren Country protests brought national media attention to the issue and

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Hydrologic Habitus

Wells, Watering Practices, and Water Supply Infrastructure

Brock Ternes and Brian Donovan

fields. Just as work on “sonic habitus” ( Schwarz 2015 ) describes how habituation to sounds are shaped by cultural meanings and collective identity, we offer a similar vision for watering: it is structured around a hydrologic habitus that embodies a

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Pamela McElwee

plastic enough to adapt to local needs and the constraints of the several parties employing them, yet be robust enough to maintain a common identity across sites” (393). ES as a boundary object tie multiple perspectives and ideas together, many of which

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“We Do Not Exist”

Illness, Invisibility, and Empowerment of Communities Struck by the Fracking Boom

Kristen M. Schorpp

activists” who are negotiating the boundary between activism and conservative political identities (110). Despite the social capital that these activists possess, however, they are unable to exert much influence on local politics when battling against the

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Park Spaces and the User Experience

Reconsidering the Body in Park Analysis Tools

Eric A. Stone and Jennifer D. Roberts

“Walking [in Nature] Is Man's Best Medicine” Recently, DC Park Rx relaunched itself as a new national organization, Park Rx America, that encourages healthcare providers to prescribe outdoor activity in parks and greenspaces as a way of expanding

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Unsettling the Land

Indigeneity, Ontology, and Hybridity in Settler Colonialism

Paul Berne Burow, Samara Brock, and Michael R. Dove

Indigenous space. As Carroll notes, “the need to maintain land-based practices as critical components of tribal identities continues to make the topic of land reacquisition and consolidation central to the study Indigenous environmental issues, and, despite

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Symbolizing Destruction

Environmental Activism, Moral Shocks, and the Coal Industry

Alison E. Adams, Thomas E. Shriver, and Landen Longest

and Klandermans 2013). In certain contexts, outward-focused anger can strengthen collective identity and solidarity around a common grievance ( Simon and Klandermans 2001 ; see also Eyerman 2007 ; Whittier 2007 ). The collective expression of anger