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“Purely Artistic”

Police Power and Popular Culture in Colonial Algerian Theater

Danielle Beaujon

Following World War II, French police surveillance in Algeria increasingly focused on the threat of Algerian nationalism and policing theater proved no exception. The police assiduously investigated the contents of plays and the background of performers, seeking to determine whether a performance could be considered “purely artistic.” In cracking down on theater, the police attempted to produce “pro-French” art that could influence Algerian loyalties, a cultural civilizing mission carried out by the unlikely figure of the beat cop. Ultimately, their mission failed. Live performances presented an opportunity for spontaneity and improvisation that revealed the weakness of colonial policing. In this article, I argue that in trying to separate art from politics, the police created an impossibly capacious idea of the political, giving officers justification for inserting themselves into intimate moments of daily life. The personal, the interpersonal, and the artistic became a realm of police intervention.

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Laurence Piper

‘The history of the Zulu people is the history of myself’.1 In Africa, as elsewhere, the notion of tradition is bound up with the discourses of ethnicity and nationalism. Typically invoking pre-colonial identities as the basis of peoplehood, such narratives of common descent are imbued with a strong sense of ‘pastness’, orientating the modern self in traditional terms. Anderson explains this invocation of tradition as a feature of the inverted nature of ethnic narratives of common descent.2 More common are accounts which focus on the ‘loss of meaning’ brought about by modernisation and the psychic security offered by an idealised past. Recent theories look to supplant this sense of tradition as reaction with a sense of tradition as creation. One example is Lonsdale’s argument that the affirmation of ethnicity in post-colonial Africa, with its associated invention of tradition, must be seen in the context of internal debates over civic virtue as pre-colonial moral economies are re-structured by the state and capitalism.

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Lauren Marx

African nationalism with a comparative analysis to that of the current political leadership in South Africa today. The question of education, land and race has been omnipresent in the South African narrative and therefore this research is important in

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Empire and Economics

Decolonising Colonialism and Its Legacies in Africa

Edited by Lawrence Hamilton

historiography and political theory. Liberalism, communism, African and Afrikaner nationalism, localised cultural and social histories and related ideological conflicts of identity have failed to grasp and explain the relations of power that continue to operate

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Romanticizing Difference

Identities in Transformation after World War I

Nadia Malinovich

empire were enjoined to respect their residents’ linguistic identities as a critical element in ensuring that Europe would have a peaceful future. Maggy Hary’s comparison of representations of Irish and Zionist nationalism in British political discourse

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Editorial

Some Senses of Pan-Africanism from the South

Christopher Allsobrook

principles haunt South Africa forty years after Biko’s death. With political independence, despite the sterling example of early nationalist leaders such as Kwame Nkrumah and Julius Nyerere, relations between African Nationalism and Pan-Africanism have tended

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Introduction

Traces of Pan Africanism and African Nationalism in Africa Today

Denis Goldberg

African Unity had different reasons for that call at different times. It is also necessary to distinguish between concepts such as African Nationalism in the different countries or even regions and Pan-Africanism relating to the whole continent. Then there

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African Dawn

Keïta Fodéba and the Imagining of National Culture in Guinea

Andrew W. M. Smith

such luminaries was discouraged, hampering the development of a consensus movement for change. When combined with the vernacular of cultural nationalism, the questionable political allegiance of elites courted the risk of external interference. The

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L’ordre et le bonheur

Langues, nations, et territoires dans la réorganisation de l’Europe après la Première guerre mondiale

Sébastien Moret

que d’être “un moyen empirique commode.” 59 L’Europe est la région du monde “qui a vu le plus clair développement d’un grand nombre de nationalismes dans lesquels l’élément linguistique est d’une très grande importance.” 60 Si tel est le cas, c

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Lawrence Ogbo Ugwuanyi

1945’ ( Mutiso and Rohio 1963: 341 ). It should also be noted that many African leaders, such as Nkrumah, Nyerere and Toure, attended the Manchester conference and that its basic idea was the need to achieve a pan-African nationalism that will serve as